Fate of 37 PSIT students hangs in the balance | india | Hindustan Times
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Fate of 37 PSIT students hangs in the balance

ABOUT 37 BTech students of the Pranveer Singh Institute of Technology (PSIT) could not appear the final semester examination this year because of irresponsible behaviour of both the UPTU and the PSIT. They are making all out efforts to save the precious year.

india Updated: May 22, 2006 01:08 IST

ABOUT 37 BTech students of the Pranveer Singh Institute of Technology (PSIT) could not appear the final semester examination this year because of irresponsible behaviour of both the UPTU and the PSIT. They are making all out efforts to save the precious year.

It is not students but their parents are also worried over the development. Because many of them have obtained loans from banks for their wards and loss of one year would prove to be costly for them.

Though the PSIT authorities have assured the students that efforts would be made to save the academic year, they are not very optimistic about the outcome of the representation they have sent to the UPTU.

It is worth mentioning here that in the wake of shortage of seats in the engineering institutes, the All India Technical Education Council (AITEC) had given permission to raise the number of seats to 60. On the recommendations of the Chancellor, the UPTU allowed admissions on the enhanced seats and About 37 students took admission in the PSIT and classes were started from January 16, 2006.

The UPTU also directed the PSIT that the students be allowed to appear the first semester examination after the completion of six months of class studies. They could not be allowed to appear the first semester after three months of class studies.

The institute on the other hand allowed these students to prepare for the second semester to be started from May 16 without clearing the first semester. However, the UPTU refused to allow them to appear in the second semester. In this peculiar situation, the actual loser is students. Though they studied for two semesters but they were not allowed to appear at any of the semester examinations. They even do not know as how their case would be settled and when. They are confused whether they would be asked to appear at the first or the second semester or both at one time.

Students said they were kept in the dark by the PSIT authorities. Though they had asked the authorities at the time of admission as how would they be able to appear the first semester after completing three months of studies against the mandatory six months, they were assured of some ‘technical’ help. Now, the college authorities are not doing anything for thei cause.