Fixing meetings but doing so 'unknowingly' | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Dec 03, 2016-Saturday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Fixing meetings but doing so 'unknowingly'

india Updated: May 19, 2012 01:17 IST
Sharad Deep
Sharad Deep
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

Small sports management companies do 'facilitate' interaction between fixers and players contracted to them, but most of these agencies claim they do it unknowingly.

Since these companies hire cricketers at the very beginning on a "3+3 contract" - three years of investment and three years of earning - they don't mind introducing players to bettors.

"I introduced a number of top India cricketers to many people, but I didn't know that some of them had dubious track records," an agent told HT on condition of anonymity.

The Lucknow-based management company had contracted many Uttar Pradesh cricketers and a Delhi-based player, who is currently in the national team.

As per the contract, the cricketers were given Rs. 3-5 lakh cash per annum, a luxury car and all other things like boarding and lodging whenever they came to Lucknow.

A risky affair
"It's always a risky affair as we hire a cricketer for the first three years and pay for all their expenses. We make money only after a contracted player plays for the country in the next three years. If he doesn't, our investment is lost," he said, adding, "If he plays for India after the first three years of investment, we take a share of 30 per cent from each of his endorsements for the next three years.

"For almost 10 years, between 1999-2009, I've invested huge money in contracting Team India and junior India players and given them cars like Honda City, Indigo, Ritz, etc and I made money too out of them," he added.

"Normally, I used to tap junior cricketers after their performances at the ICC Youth World Cup, because they had a better chance of playing for the senior side," said another company head. "In fact, one of the cricketers, after playing for the country, invested a good amount in my company as he too wanted to make money through the endorsements of other cricketers, but there was nothing in black and white," he added.

"Since management companies know the movement of players, their likes and dislikes, they are sometimes forced to share information with others," he said.