From corporates to journalists, it is business as usual | india | Hindustan Times
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From corporates to journalists, it is business as usual

This refers to the report No move for no-confidence motion (December 3). While India hopes to become a superpower, everyone from politicians to corporate giants to journalists is busy robbing the exchequer of money.

india Updated: Dec 05, 2010 21:03 IST

From corporates to journalists, it is business as usual

This refers to the report No move for no-confidence motion (December 3). While India hopes to become a superpower, everyone from politicians to corporate giants to journalists is busy robbing the exchequer of money. Unfortunately, the common man has been reduced to the level of a hapless spectator to this. The Opposition is hampering the functioning of Parliament. This is only working to the government’s advantage. It is utilising the time to make up its cover up for the various scams. Worse, though people are aware of the misdeeds of our politicians, they vote the same people to power every five years.

Amit Bhandari, Delhi

UPA’s digging it’s own grave

The editorial People don’t forget easily (Our Take, December 2) should be a warning to the government. It’s high time the UPA government set its house in order. Instead of implementing its orders, the government is confronting the Supreme Court on the issue of corruption. It should have carefully weighed the pros and cons of appointing PJ Thomas to the post of Central Vigilance Commissioner (CVC). The controversy has done harm to both Thomas’ career and the government’s reputation.

Shanti Bhushan, Ghaziabad

II

It doesn’t matter whether the CVC remains or resigns, but the government’s image has already taken a hit. Various scams, like the CWG, 2G spectrum and Adarsh housing society, have proved that the common man can no longer trust the Congress government. The debate over the CVC’s nomination was avoidable. It’s true that public memory is no longer short.

Anubha Shukla, Delhi

Media are not above the law This refers to Samar Halarnkar’s article Dangerous liaisons (Maha Bharat, December 2). All the media persons who feature in the Radiagate scandal should accept their fault in holding back the story on corporate lobbyists trying to influence the government. Their justification, of trying to coax information out of Niira Radia to expose India’s top industrialists later, has no takers. As one of the pillars of democracy, the press can’t be ambivalent about its role.

G David Milton, via email

In a world of its own

With reference to the editorial Taking off in Marathi (The Pundit, December 2), politicians like Raj Thackeray thrive on cheap publicity. His asking Jet Airways to make in-flight announcements in Marathi and show movies and keep newspapers in that language confirms that his party lacks a solid political ideology. Thackeray can’t expect to win elections on his doctrine of regionalism. People like Thackeray harm the nation more than terrorists. The media should stop giving the Thackerays undue publicity.

M Kumar, via email

The US has a lot to hide

This refers to the report WikiLeaks revelations (December 1). The whistleblower website WikiLeaks has given sleepless nights to the US government and American ambassadors around the globe. The subsequent news of WikiLeaks website getting hacked wasn’t surprising. It shows that the US government has many skeletons in its cupboard and it will go to any length to curtail the freedom of the press.

Anshuman Gaikwad, via email

Stop the numbers game

With reference to the report Reader’s choice: Hindustan Times (December 3), both Hindustan Times and The Times of India should stop putting each other down by proffering arbitrary statistics. It is unbecoming of the top two newspaper brands in India to indulge in mudslinging. Let the readers decide which is the better newspaper.

Pramod Narain, Lucknow