From the Metro, it’s a different city | india | Hindustan Times
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From the Metro, it’s a different city

By day Gurgaon is one city, by night it takes on a whole new perspective. Now, with the advent of the Metro, people have got one more perspective to look at Gurgaon from.

india Updated: Jun 22, 2010 00:46 IST
Eshani Mathur

By day Gurgaon is one city, by night it takes on a whole new perspective. Now, with the advent of the Metro, people have got one more perspective to look at Gurgaon from.

Travelling on the elevated track in the Metro, people saw the city’s landscape change from lush green to concrete. The plush farmhouses and tree-lined MG Road gave way to the high-rises on the mall-mile.

“Gurgaon, from this height, resembles nothing less than Manhattan with its swanky, tall towers and malls all along the Gurgaon metro route. Barring a small stretch through Sikandarpur, the view was remarkable. As the Metro moved further through Aya Nagar, Arjan Garh and Ghitorni, the site was amazing with all green on the either sides. It was interesting to look into some of the farmhouses,” said Raman Kashyap, an executive working with Citi Financial.

Some of the architectural attractions on the Metro ride were the RITES, IFFCO Tokio buildings and the malls that dot the mall-mile. The commercial towers of distant DLF Cybercity and the opera house Kingdom of Dreams in Sector 29 is also visible from the Metro.

“The sight after sunset, when the lights come on in these tall structures, is amazing. The Airtel building stood out with its red and white lights,” said another passenger.

People from surrounding areas also arrived to see the new metro and the metro exceeded their expectations. “The metro gave us a feel of traveling abroad. We got a panoramic view of the city,” said Safia Khan, a commuter.

And like all previous lines that were thrown up to the public, most of the people who rode the line on Monday had come for a joyride. The stations on the 14.47-km long Gurgaon-Qutub Minar Metro line had a look of revelry as a number of commuters boarded the trains along with their families and children.

However, most of the serious Metro users, the officer-goers, skipped the Metro on its first day and stuck to their regular transportation.

Kris Punia, a class 10 student of Shri Ram School and South City resident, turned up at the HUDA City Centre Metro station with his parents at 7.35 am. “I have come with my parents just to ride up to Qutub Minar and back, nowhere else. Later, I’ll come with my friends for another fun ride,” he said.