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Getting off fast train can be hurtful

A STUNNED silence prevailed as the viewers filed out, only footsteps echoing in the corridor. The shockwave sent out by the decisive shot had effectively frozen the audience reactions that spring spontaneously after a show.

india Updated: Dec 12, 2006 01:29 IST

A STUNNED silence prevailed as the viewers filed out, only footsteps echoing in the corridor. The shockwave sent out by the decisive shot had effectively frozen the audience reactions that spring spontaneously after a show.

The Dombivili fast train had arrived. It was the movie of the year, winning several prestigious awards including that of best entry at the Los Angeles film festival.

It ran five non-stop shows on Sunday at DAVV auditorium transporting Sanand members from holiday mood to the stark reality of life.

We all have our fast Dewas, Ujjains or Mhows to negotiate everyday. Fretting about inconveniences caused by the callousness of the people charged with certain duties is unavoidable part of one’s life.

Most stop short of their boiling point, rarely one goes off his rocker. Breaking of law is a common occurrence, but when a law-abiding fellow takes law into his hands it creates discomfiture for lawmakers and its enforcers who are actually doing the opposite. Then a police officer, who is ironically a conscientious man, has to silence the rabble-rouser.

Noted Marathi actor Sandeep Kulkarni powerfully projected a typical middle class bank officer. Part of the strength coming from his acting prowess and most from his retaliations against the irregularities the common man has to face everyday – water and electricity playing truant, rampant bribery, rich and powerful circumventing the law, overcharging hospitals, even wrong parking and habitual jumping of traffic signals.

He goes lashing out with a cricket bat and graduates on to a jack knife and then to a revolver. His saga of bravery against corruption winds up in an hour and fifty minutes with a bullet in his heart; his empty gun not even making a dent in the road-roller of anarchy.

Despite gripping picturisation of the everyday story, the film does not help to better the common man’s lot. On the contrary it sends wrong message, leaving dutiful cops to sulk. At one point in the drama an elderly victim of the doctors’ lobby tries to educate him on the sanctity of his method.

While that wisdom cannot be trashed, truthful insistence, much the way celluloid Munna Bhai does, needs to be upheld by united citizenry.

The most society does is to chew on rave reviews, feel sorry for the state of affairs and continue to tread path with heads hung helplessly.

Unfortunately such powerful instigation is seen as a work of art, defeating its very purpose. Still this movie with English subtitles is worth seeing and applauding Nishikant Kamath for a good plot and direction.