Guess how long it takes to enjoy a holiday | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Dec 05, 2016-Monday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Guess how long it takes to enjoy a holiday

india Updated: Jan 18, 2012 19:35 IST

ANI
Highlight Story

It takes almost a day for holidaymakers to unpack, recuperate and settle into an accommodation, and they actually start enjoying their trip from the second day, a new study has revealed.

The moment they finally relax is at 21 hours and 31 minutes after arriving at their destination, a study of 2,000 adults has found.

It is only during the second day when we start to unwind enough to start beginning to enjoy the sunshine break.

The study, by global holiday rentals company HomeAway.co.uk, also found around one third of holidaymakers start worrying about the hassle of travelling home within 72 hours of arriving.

“We work the longest hours in Europe so holidays shouldn’t feel like hard work too,” the Daily Mail quoted spokeswoman Marie Chenailler as saying.

The study found most people start to get their head around the currency by the second day while at the same time, the body clock starts to adjust after a long haul flight.

It is also the point when we following a long haul trip the body clock starts to adjust to the different time zone.

Feeling more comfortable within the surroundings is also more common on the second day too.

The study also found one third of British take well in to the third day to forget about the office and slip out of ‘work mode’.

One quarter said they only managed to truly relax for 48 hours of their holiday - usually around the middle of the break.

By comparison they spend just five hours and 29 minutes planning their holiday and picking their destination.

Nearly half of Brits said they often return home immediately in need of another holiday because the experience was so stressful.

The stress of getting to the destination was the number one cause of tension, followed by the pressures of not knowing the language and worrying about overspending as a result of confusion over exchange rates.