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Health means good chemistry

IF YOUR bodily chemicals are balanced, you are healthy. But, if they are not, you are unhealthy. Therefore, we need to evolve a system which restores the chemical balance without any side-effects.

india Updated: Jun 20, 2006 00:02 IST

IF YOUR bodily chemicals are balanced, you are healthy. But, if they are not, you are unhealthy. Therefore, we need to evolve a system which restores the chemical balance without any side-effects.

And this can help us do away with anti-biotics,” says Dr Ejaz Ahmed who is working on how to balance out the body chemicals.

Dr Ahmed has specialised in pancreatic cancer. “There are few doctors who are working on pancreas on the other hand there has been spurt in the disease related with pancreas. Pancreas is a vital organ in the human body that produces insulin and balances glucose. The food we eat is converted into glucose. Insulin in turn converts glucose into energy that activates various organs of the human body,” he says.

After schooling from Springdale, Ahmed took admission to Christian College.

Fighter planes zooming in the blue sky fascinated him since childhood and he dreamt of becoming a fighter pilot, too. But destiny had something else in store for him. His mother motivated him work for the humanity. “Study medicine. Help the poor who are infected with chronic diseases and have no money for treatment,” she told young Ahmed.

Mother’s words left a deep impact on his mind and he aimed to become a doctor. Ahmed decided to study medicine in the top institutes of Britain. In 1989, he cleared the test and got admission to Saint Georges Hospital, London.

When it seemed that he was about to realize his dreams, he faced a financial crunch. How would he meet his expenses? A large sum was required to pursue the course and his family has limited resources. But, iron grit seldom fails. After landing at London, Ahmed worked in a restaurant, drove a taxi to earn for his study. “I suffered no homesickness since 30 per cent of the students were from Asia,” he says.

Why did he decide to specialise in pancreatic cancer? Ahmed informed that one of his teachers Dr Johan Thomanson motivated him to study the disease related with pancreas. “There is lot of work to do on pancreas,” Thomanson told him. When ‘guru’ showed the way, there was no going back for him.  

He plunged himself into the pancreas specialisation.

How can one detect pancreatic cancer? Dr Ahmed says continuing stomachache, loss of weight, recurrent fever, disturbance in the digestive system are clear indication of the cancer. “One should visit the doctor immediately for early diagnosis and treatment of the disease,” he says.

Cancer does not mean death. Now the medical science is developed to put a patient on stable condition through medication. There is need to create awareness among people so that they go for early diagnosis to protect the precious life.

Ahmed has returned to his motherland and has set up a clinic ‘Chahat Health Care’ in Aashiana. “It’s our duty to work for our own country. We have poor in majority. They need our service,” he says.