Highest priority to farm sector in State: Kothari | india | Hindustan Times
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Highest priority to farm sector in State: Kothari

THE STATE is lucky to have the best agro-climatic zone features, said Minister in charge for the district Himmat Kothari. He was speaking as chief guest at the inauguration of the three-day State level agriculture fair on Jawaharlal Nehru Agriculture College grounds on Friday.

india Updated: Feb 03, 2007 20:46 IST

THE STATE is lucky to have the best agro-climatic zone features, said Minister in charge for the district Himmat Kothari. He was speaking as chief guest at the inauguration of the three-day State level agriculture fair on Jawaharlal Nehru Agriculture College grounds on Friday.

Kothari said the State Government was according highest priority to agriculture and allied sectors. Chief Minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan during his recent visit to Israel has signed deals for transfer of technology and expertise on drip, sprinkler and other modern specialised methods of agriculture from that country.

Agriculture loans have been reduced from the earlier 12 per cent to just seven per cent, laboratories for soil testing are being established in each district and Kisan Raths are being sent for informing and alerting farmers about latest developments and innovations.

Kothari praised organic methods of farming and reminded farmers that only about half a century back farming in the country was mostly restricted to organic methods and use of fertiliser, pesticide and chemical manure were unheard of. The high yield received is only a short-term benefit as continuous use of these unnatural products weather and beat down the soil. The fair incorporates all these angles, also shows how to market organic produce, and where it can be sold.

In his presidential address, former Gau Seva Board president Mahendra Kumar Bum pointed out that incorporating organic farming can double profits. He urged establishment of agriculture universities in the private sector. District Collector Vivek Aggarwal gave information about the fair. Agriculture College Dean Dr S S Tomar proposed the vote of thanks. A magazine and calendar were also released on the occasion.

The fair has been divided into four zones - organic farming (jaivik hat), agro-implements (including tractors, harvesters, sprinklers and the likes), horticulture, fishery and animal husbandry and farming literature.

The chief interest in the fair was Giriraj breed of hen developed by the Bangalore Centre as a cross between the ‘desi’ variety and hybrid. Egg for hatching is available at Rs 8.50/egg with transportation charges extra and can be hatched anywhere for Rs 2.50/egg.

Hatching is 80 per cent successful and about 60 per cent female and 40 per cent male chicks are obtained. The egg sells for Rs 30/ egg and mutton sells at about Rs 200/kg.

The other chief attraction is Emu farming concept brought in by Golden Eggs Emu Farm, Thane (Maharashtra). The egg of this Australian bird sells at a whooping Rs 1000/kg and the bird itself grows up to 25 kg.

The meat is 98 per cent cholesterol-free and sells for Rs 400/kg. The other animals included Kadaknath hen, several types of fish, Jamnapari goat and Malwi, Nimari, Tharparkar, Gir and Sahiwal breeds of cows.

Several farmers visited the fair on the first day and obtained information on the lucrative yet less practiced organic framing, saw latest agriculture implements and read literature and publications like Krishi Manthan. Officials from all primary sector units will be present throughout the fair.