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Honchos mull political plunge to drive change

Peeved over the poor governance in the country and step-motherly treatment meted out to Gurgaon, a group of corporate heads and professionals are mulling over floating a political party. Deevakar Anand reports.

india Updated: Aug 27, 2012 02:16 IST
Deevakar Anand

Peeved over the poor governance in the country and step-motherly treatment meted out to Gurgaon, a group of corporate heads and professionals are mulling over floating a political party.

Although the idea is still in a conceptual stage, things may take a definite shape soon. With resentment against the system and a desire to bring about change as the unifying force, a group of corporate honchos, legal eagles, young HNIs (high net worth individuals) and activists held a meeting on Sunday.

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The meeting witnessed some inspiring moments as participants underlined that if honchos with scientific management skills and fund-raising abilities can run successful corporations, they can significantly contribute to the country's political system too.

"Though it's a long way to go before we have an all-inclusive platform to fight the embedded corrupt political system, we are certainly trying to come up with a social pressure group as we are also stakeholders in the society," Bhupinder Singh, chief executive officer at Serco Global Services, told HT.

To be held regularly from now on, the meetings would focus on a bottoms-up approach towards finding solutions to the civic and law-and-order mess.

"Given the emotional context the country is going through where people are fed up with the existing political and administrative incumbents, it was the opportune time to invest our energies to streamline a way forward," said Nitin Seth, MD and country head, Fidelity India Business Services Pvt. Ltd.

The business leaders and other eminent residents didn't rule out taking a full-fledged political recourse like launching a political party in the future.

"While we still manage to use our influence to get our legitimate work done, it's the common man who suffers at the hands of the paralysed system," said Preeti Mann, a city-based researcher.