Hyderabad IIT-JEE topper prefers road less travelled | india | Hindustan Times
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Hyderabad IIT-JEE topper prefers road less travelled

You would expect a student of the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), the country’s top engineering school, to be sketching out plans of a high-flying engineering career with blue-chip companies and placing zero after zero to their salaries.

india Updated: May 26, 2010 23:20 IST
Ashok Das

You would expect a student of the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), the country’s top engineering school, to be sketching out plans of a high-flying engineering career with blue-chip companies and placing zero after zero to their salaries.

But leave Anumula Jithender Reddy, this year’s topper at the joint entrance examination for the IITs nationwide, out of the list.

Jithendar doesn’t want to be a millionaire. Instead, he wants to spend his life researching arcane problems of physics inside labs and explaining them to university students. But mind you — they have to be the world’s best labs, and the world’s best universities.

“After graduation, I would like to go to Stanford (University) and take up research in physics and may be get into academics,” he said.

For now, he is opting to study electronics and communication engineering (ECE) at IIT-Bombay. “I have chosen Mumbai because the faculty there is very good. And ECE has more to do with physics,” he said.

Jithendar is the youngest of three children of a teacher couple from Warangal town in Andhra Pradesh’s backward and strife-torn Telangana region.

Father A. Ramachandra Reddy is a professor at the National Institute of Technology (NIT) in Warangal, while mother Anumula Shobha teaches at a government primary school.

Jithender studied at St. Gabriel School in Kazipet before moving to Hyderabad to join the Narayan College, whose students have traditionally done well at IIT tests. “I was expecting a single-digit rank (to be in the top 10). But I didn’t expect to top,” he said. “It was a once-in-a-lifetime moment.” Second-ranked Uday K. Shah is also from the same college.

For IIT aspirants who hate mathematics, Jithender has a word of advice: “Don’t ignore maths. Keep your calm. Follow the subjects, the rest will follow.” It certainly did for him.