‘I never knew what normal life was’ | india | Hindustan Times
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‘I never knew what normal life was’

Traumatised by the years of sexual abuse she claims her father subjected her to, Sangita (name changed), the 21-year-old elder daughter of Mira Road businessman Kishore Chauhan, was in the habit of weeping for hours together in a corner of the flat the family lived in.

india Updated: Mar 23, 2009 01:07 IST
Rachna Pratihar

Traumatised by the years of sexual abuse she claims her father subjected her to, Sangita (name changed), the 21-year-old elder daughter of Mira Road businessman Kishore Chauhan, was in the habit of weeping for hours together in a corner of the flat the family lived in.

Shrinking into the corner, she would curse her fate and life as the tears flowed.

With no one to console her or to talk to about the mental trauma she was going through, the hapless girl, who said she had never experienced a normal life, could neither concentrate on her studies nor be at peace with herself.

“I would cry the entire night and never knew what normal life was. Eventually, I found it difficult to concentrate on my studies as well,” Sangita said in her statement to the Mira Road police late in the evening on Saturday. “With a bleak future in front of me, I did not find a reason to go for further studies.”

Eventually she failed in Class 10, and her parents did not allow her to study further.

Over time, Sangita began to realise that she was raped only when her younger sister was not around and started using her sister as a shield.

“My parents used to force me into the act when my sister used to be at school or when she was out,” Sangita said to Sub Divisional Police Officer from Mira Road division Maithli Jha. “It was then that I started ensuring that my sister spent most of her time at home and would request her to do so.”

Sangita never shared her pain with her sister, knowing it would bring trouble to her life as well.

“Nevertheless, the Chauhans posed as a normal family to outsiders, who never got a whiff of their deeds,” said Jha.

Jha added that the girls desired to begin their life afresh and had decided to lead an independent life.

The sisters will now undergo DNA tests.

The police said the two will also undergo counselling and that they were looking for non-governmental organisations to adopt them.

“A few NGOs have come forward to adopt and rehabilitate them,” said Jha. “We are also approaching various social organisations and paving the way to rebuild their future.”