If you?re lucky, your question paper may be easy | india | Hindustan Times
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If you?re lucky, your question paper may be easy

This year at the High School examinations, one set of Hindi II question paper asks an examinee to write an essay on any one of seven topics while another set of question paper gives just five choices to the examinee for an essay that is worth 10 marks. Similarly, in the Social Science I paper for visually challenged examinees, one set of question paper asks examinee to mark the place and state on a map where Puroshottam Ram was born .

india Updated: Apr 02, 2006 00:20 IST

This year at the High School examinations, one set of Hindi II question paper asks an examinee to write an essay on any one of seven topics while another set of question paper gives just five choices to the examinee for an essay that is worth 10 marks.

Similarly, in the Social Science I paper for visually challenged examinees, one set of question paper asks examinee to mark the place and state on a map where Puroshottam Ram was born while another set of question paper asks the examinee to mark the new capital declared by Akbar and in which state it is situated!

And, it’s just the examinees’ luck whether they get the tougher question paper or the easier one! Not just hard work then, that matters in the UP Board examinations this year, thanks to the Madhyamik Shiksha Parishad.

The Parishad policy is that different sets of question papers for the same subjects are prepared with variance in difficulty. One set may be a whole lot easier. This variation is detectable in question papers for almost all the subjects.

Even for maths. Teachers have dubbed this as very unfair to the examinees.

Madhamik Shikshak Sangh president RP Mishra says, “This is not the right way to set question papers and they must do something to do away with the advantage which some examinees may enjoy at a particular centre”.

“The examinees’ potential must be judged in a fair manner and we will surely discuss this with the Board,” says Mishra. The Board officials, however, see nothing wrong in the system. Madhyamik Shiksha Parishad secretary Vasudev Yadav said, “As long as questions are not being asked out of syllabus one should avoid making much hue and cry. Question papers are set by different persons and hence questions cannot be identical.”

He argued: “There is a perfect blend of easy and hard question in our paper. We do ensure that at least 40 per cent of the questions be easy. Thirty per cent are slightly tough and another 30 per cent even more complicated. This is our blueprint. Besides, there are some confidential reasons for which different sets of question papers are printed and we cannot disclose this to the Press.”

Experts say different sets of question papers are prepared to avoid leaking of papers.

“Let’s say if a question paper is leaked in the State capital, then, owing to availability of different set of question paper, a new set can be easily distributed. This helps the Board maintain the sanctity of the examinations. But there is no doubt that efforts should be made to ensure that there is a perfect blend of easy and tough questions,” said a teacher.