Illegal cloth market shops bane of Rohtas Nagar | india | Hindustan Times
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Illegal cloth market shops bane of Rohtas Nagar

The people of Rohtas Nagar, Rohtas Nagar West, Kabul Nagar and parts of Rohtas Nagar East complain of flooding caused by ineffective drainage and sewerage systems.

india Updated: Nov 27, 2013 01:31 IST
HT Correspondent

The shops in Rohtas Nagar’s unauthorised cloth market are actually extensions of houses. “They have occupied roads and lanes, leaving little space for the movement of vehicles and pedestrians. There is no political willingness among leaders to resolve the issue as the unauthorised market constitutes a huge vote bank,” said Inder Kumar, a resident of Rohtas Nagar colony.

The people of Rohtas Nagar, Rohtas Nagar West, Kabul Nagar and parts of Rohtas Nagar East complain of flooding caused by ineffective drainage and sewerage systems. “Every monsoon, roads get water-logged because of the defective drainage system. This results in outbreaks of viral diseases,” said Gyanendra Sharma, a resident of Shahdara.

Pankaj Rastogi, another resident, said the constituency had not seen any significant development in many years. “We face frequent power cuts during summers. The number of street lights is not enough. Our children do not have a park to go and play. The law-and-order situation is poor and security of women is another major concern,” he said.

Residents of Chitrakut DDA Colony and the Ram Nagar residential area spoke of several problems.

“We are Congress supporters but this time, none of my family members will vote. We cannot vote for any other party and will not vote for the Congress this time as the MLA has done nothing for our betterment,” said Sanjeev Yadav, a resident of Chitrakut DDA Colony.

The MLA, Vipin Sharma, however, said: “The flooding and sewerage problems are matters of the past as we have installed pumps and repaired the drainage system in the entire constituency,” he said. The market, he added, was at least 50 years old and it was difficult to remove it as hundreds of families earned their living from there.