Implementation of central projects in Nagaland poor: CAG | india | Hindustan Times
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Implementation of central projects in Nagaland poor: CAG

The implementation of projects funded under a special central assistance in Nagaland was poor due to inadequate planning, according to a report by the Comptroller and Auditor General of India.

india Updated: Mar 14, 2009 13:04 IST

The implementation of projects funded under a special central assistance in Nagaland was poor due to inadequate planning, according to a report by the Comptroller and Auditor General of India.

Pointing out projects were selected without detailed survey to identify gaps, the report tabled in the Assembly said perspective plans were not prepared and concept papers in respect of 37 out of 50 projects funded under non-lapsable central pool of resources (NLCPR) till March last year were not prepared.

NLCPR is a pool of fund set up by the Centre from the unspent balance of the 10 per cent provided in the budget of central ministries and department for member states of North Eastern Council (NEC).

This fund is distributed to the NE states by the Union DoNER ministry on 90:10 sharing basis as per proposals made by respective state.

The report said financial management was deficient and the state government had not released its matching share (10 per cent) to the implementing agencies resulting in delay in execution of works.

Monitoring and evaluation mechanism remained grossly inefficient which had already affected the pace of implementation of the projects, the report observed.

In Nagaland, 60 projects at a cost of Rs 836.57 crore were approved by the DONER ministry during 1998-2008. Of these, 10 projects involving Rs 118.09 crore relating to roads and bridges were handed over to Border Roads Organisation (BRO) for execution.

The remaining 50 projects costing Rs 718.48 crore were implemented by 12 departments of the state against which Rs 507.26 crore were released by the centre and the state government.

The report said the state government deducted in an unauthorised way Rs 3.40 crore during 2003-08 as "departmental charges" out of the funds allotted under 10 projects executed by five implementing agencies, but a scrutiny revealed that there was no provision for deduction of such charges.

Construction of 4 km road was awarded and paid to two different contractors resulting in excess payment of Rs 3.17 crore, the report said.

The 22.92 MW thermal power plant at Dimapur had been abandoned after incurring an expenditure of Rs 32 crore for construction of building and procurement of machinery and equipment which were lying utilised at project site.

On implementation of National Rural Health Mission (NMHR) in Nagaland, the report said the mid-term review of the mission implementation for the period 2005-08 was not encouraging due to non-completion of household and facility survey and non-identification of the gaps in rural healthcare.

There was a shortfall in the creation of infrastructure and inadequate number of medical officers, medicines and equipment, and this was further compounded by non-release of state share of funds and non-existence of monitoring mechanism in the department, the report said.

Although NRHM was launched all over the country in April 2005 for seven year period (2205-12), the programme was started in Nagaland in February 2006 without preparing a perspective plan (2005-12) and surveying households and healthcare facility across the state, the report revealed.