In Indore, temple loses out to potable water need | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jun 29, 2017-Thursday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

In Indore, temple loses out to potable water need

In Indore’s Rahul Gandhi Nagar, a plot of government land meant for a temple was used to build a reverse osmosis (RO) filtration plant.

india Updated: May 29, 2013 01:58 IST
Saeed khan

Here’s a lesson the BJP may benefit from: Temple is not a priority when there’s no clean drinking water to be had.

In Indore’s Rahul Gandhi Nagar, a plot of government land meant for a temple was used to build a reverse osmosis (RO) filtration plant.

Before the facility came up, the settlement of 850-odd families relied on a nearby borewell. But the water, tests revealed, had faecal contamination and people who drank it invariably fell ill.

Paid for by the Rockefeller Foundation under its Asian Cities Climate Change Resilience Network project and maintained entirely by the community, the RO plant charges a mere Rs 5 for 20 litres of water. Disinfected with ultraviolet light and ozonised to boot, it has been locally dubbed Amrit Jal.

Sarita Devi, the head of Basti Vikas Samiti, the 11-strong all-women team which maintains the plant, said 153 families have registered for Amrit Jal since the plant started working last month.

“We need 250 families (to register) before the plant becomes self-sustained,” said Megha Burvey of Taru, ACCRNN’s India partner.