In pics: Kailash Satyarthi, an activist at work | india | Hindustan Times
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In pics: Kailash Satyarthi, an activist at work

Kailash Satyarthi is a campaigner who has been contributed immensely to the field of child rights. Most hadn't even heard the name of his organisation Bachpan Bachao Andolan (BBA) before the announcement of the Nobel Peace Prize on Monday.

india Updated: Oct 10, 2014 16:54 IST
HT Correspondent

Kailash Satyarthi, co-winner of the Nobel Peace Prize for 2014, has freed tens of thousands of Indian children forced into slavery by businessmen, land-owners and others. Satyarthi, who was trained as an electrical engineer, founded the Bachpan Bachao Andolan or Save the Childhood Movement in 1980. Satyarthi, who was trained as an electrical engineer, founded the Bachpan Bachao Andolan or Save the Childhood Movement in 1980. Here are images of Satyarthi and his work at Bachpan Bachao Andolan.

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Bachpan Bachao Andolan was India’s first civil society campaign against the exploitation of children.

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BBA was set up in 1980 and to date has touched the lives of 80,000 young people.

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Showing great personal courage, Kailash Satyarthi, maintaining Gandhi's tradition, has headed various forms of protests and demonstrations, all peaceful, focusing on the grave exploitation of children for financial gain.

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One of the key initiatives of BBA is its Bal Mitra Gram (BMG) programme, an innovative development model to combat child labour, protect child rights and ensure access to quality education to all.

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Through a number of training programmes, Satyarthi also helps children sold to pay their parents' debts to find new lives and serve as agents of prevention within their communities.


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Since the model’s inception in 2001, BBA has transformed 356 villages as child friendly villages across 11 states of India.

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Kailash Satyarthi has been a relentless crusader of child rights for years now.

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The children of these villages attend school, participate in bal panchayat (child governance bodies), yuwa mandals (youth groups) and mahila mandal and interact regularly with the gram panchayat.

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In BMGs, BBA ensures that children up to the age of 14 have access to free, universal and quality education and schools have proper infrastructure so that girls don’t drop out. It also works with local communities to address local traditions like child marriages that disempower girls.

Signalling a larger intent behind jointly awarding the prize, the Nobel Committee said it "regards it as an important point for a Hindu and a Muslim, an Indian and a Pakistani, to join in a common struggle for education and against extremism."



The struggle against suppression and for the rights of children and adolescents contributes to the realization of the "fraternity between nations" that Alfred Nobel mentions in his will as one of the criteria for the Nobel Peace Prize, it said.



The rivalry between India and Pakistan is among the world’s most intractable border disputes, one that is seen as a major source of instability in South Asian. The two countries have fought three wars since their independence from Britain in 1947.