Sanskrit in IITs: Sisodia vs Irani makes Twitter explode | india | Hindustan Times
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Sanskrit in IITs: Sisodia vs Irani makes Twitter explode

It started as an innocuous social media taunt by one politician to another but soon devolved into a bizarre Twitter fight that brought out the tech geeks and possibly even inspired an online love story.

india Updated: Apr 27, 2016 13:53 IST
HT Correspondent
Smriti Irani
The saga began on Monday when Delhi education minister Manish Sisodia taunted Union human resource development minister Smriti Irani for ordering IITs to teach Sanskrit.

It started as an innocuous social media taunt by one politician to another but soon devolved into a bizarre Twitter fight that brought out the tech geeks and possibly even inspired an online love story.

The saga began on Monday when Delhi education minister Manish Sisodia taunted Union human resource development minister Smriti Irani for ordering IITs to teach Sanskrit.

In a series of apparently sarcastic tweets, Sisodia took on the BJP leader.

“One should understand Sanskrit is the only language which can compete with C++, Java, SOL, Python, Javascript...1/2”

“All computers in India using languages like C+, Java, SOL, Python..should b declared antinational once IITians learn working in sanskrit.2/2” Why anti-national? We’re guessing the AAP leader was trying to comment on the recent wave of patriotism that has seen ministers claiming ancient India was adept in modern medicine and technology.

This was all that happened. A statement and a taunt. But this small teaser is all it took for Twitter to explode.

Read: Govt to set up Sanskrit cells in IITs to research ancient science

The social media site started building a story around it by adding fight scenes, sub-plots and romantic encounters.

“As a Computer Scientist, I can say @msisodia displays abysmal ignorance of computer & natural languages and Sanskrit,” @sankrant tweeted.

This was the most re-tweeted reply for Sisodia’s second tweet. This was followed by a flurry of tweets by users who thought Sisodia was actually supporting inclusion of Sanskrit in IITs. “This Guy is Education Minister of capital of India”

“Tell me a computer which uses Sanskrit as it’s programming language. Are you so dumb?”

“sanskrit is not a programming language like C++ ( there is no lang called C+ which you ve tweeted BTW. Lol”

“So, sir, how many members of your own family plans to learn and adopt Sanskrit! And what your own plan??”

And finally one confused individual dared to express his confusion...

“is this sarcastically or are u serious?? If serious then god saves us frm this so called Edu Ministers..”

After reading the tweets, even we had to re-check whether Sisodia was indeed being sarcastic.

And a lot of sub-plots emerged

1. Two users got into a fight over a spelling mistake in Sisodia’s tweet.

“its not SOL. Its SQL. and, not every computer runs on these.” said one user.

“SOL is correct. Sisodia talking about language and SOL is language and SQL is database” said the other.

“But SOL is used in domain specific legacy systems. He was talkin abt systems that are currently running the computers” the other shot back.

“SOL is also used to run system.” Pat came the reply.

They went on fighting over which one was correct, and many jargon-filled tweets later, they agreed to disagree.

“SOL means Sisodia Oriented Language? Or is it a new movie that @ArvindKejriwal will review?” Another user’s genuine confusion.

2. A man and woman ended up fixing a call over learning to code in Sanksrit

She wanted to know whether one can code in Sankskrit. He replied in complicated lingo. She asked whether he can call and explain. He said sure. Karan Johar, take note.

3. Users started posting journal articles, research papers that ‘proved’ that Sankskrit was a good programming language.

“Ironically, scientists have argued that Sanskrit is indeed the most suitable language for programming”, a user posted with a screen shot of a research paper.

“Indeed Sanskrit is best suited for programming. Expert programmers has said,” another said quoting from a vedic science website.

“Write a “Hello World” in Sanskrit,” another user challenged.

“sir i think u have not read computer science in ur life. If people can develop s/w in chinese language. Then y not in sanskriti” another reasoned out.