India didn't play like a team: Kapil Dev | india | Hindustan Times
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India didn't play like a team: Kapil Dev

The Haryana hurricane bemoans that Individual players feats find more prominence than team's achievement, thereby relegating collective effort.

india Updated: Jan 10, 2007 00:49 IST

Lack of team effort was the most important factor that led to Indias humiliating defeat in the tour of South Africa, former captain Kapil Dev said.

"India didn't play like a team while the Proteas played better as a team," he said during an interactive session with students of a city school.

The 'Haryana hurricane', who had been evading comments on India's disastrous tour of South Africa was finally, 'bowled' by the students, who were inquisitive to know about his reasoning of Team India's below par performance.

Public response to cricket, celebrating individual heroics above poor team performance too contributed to the sorry state of affairs, he bemoaned. Individual players feats find more prominence than team's achievement, thereby relegating collective effort, he pointed out.

On the raging debate on the form of Virendar Sehwag and Sachin Tendulkar, he evaded a direct response saying "I'm neither a selector nor a coach now. So, that is not up to me to decide", he said.

"If you don't believe in yourself don't play,"he said to another query. We need not wait for some deadline to make the team the best for every next assignment."

"Give your 100 per cent with determination and dedication. Make the players come out with their best. Defeat should never be allowed to overcome the players", he said.

He said West Indies, in his opinion, was the best team during his playing years as it had many greats, who also displayed sportsmanship. Of the current lot Kapil rated the Aussies as the best simply because they maintain the winning streak."There is nothing wrong in employing a foreign coach", he said responding to another question. However, engaging an outsider, in his opinion, would convey that the country did not have good coaches.

On the lack of patronage for women's cricket, he expressed confidence that the situation would change and women's cricket would receive due recognition. In his view, it was nothing but a reflection of the reactionary social mores, which accorded inferior status to women.

Kapil drew a parallel between mathematics and googly. Asked to comment about Abdul Quadir's googly, he said to master both one required sustained practice and training.