India too will find going tough, predicts Amla | india | Hindustan Times
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India too will find going tough, predicts Amla

The visitors began well, they looked set for a big total. Harbhajan Singh and Ishant Sharma then shared six wickets among them and Piyush Chawla claimed two to bowl out the visitors for 265.

india Updated: Apr 11, 2008 19:17 IST
MR Mishra

South Africa's in-form batsman Hashim Amla on Friday admitted that his team lost "too many wickets" towards the end but warned India that they would also find the going tough in the third and final cricket Test.

"We lost too many wickets after a good start. It is not an easy wicket to settle down. But whether we have enough runs on the board will be known tomorrow when India come in to bat", Amla said after the opening day's play which saw South Africa being bundled out for 265 in the first innings.

The visitors began well and at 152 for one at some stage, they looked set for a big total. Harbhajan Singh and Ishant Sharma then shared six wickets among them and Piyush Chawla claimed two to bowl out the visitors for 265.

Amla, the only Indian-origin player in the South African squad, said the Green Park track was turning slowly and the batsmen have to play with a positive attitude to be able to survive.

"It had a lot more turn on the first day than any other wicket we have played on. So that is why the first innings total was important for us...Whether it is good enough, we will know tomorrow", said the batsman who struck a sedate half-century today. Already cracks are evident on the pitch, which looks far from a first day track.

Amla said it was important for the settled batsmen to make their stay in the middle count.

"If you can be there in the middle long enough, you have to make it count. It is difficult for a new batsman to settle down," he said.

Asked what a batsman should do to survive in such conditions, Amla said "You really have to work hard against the spinners. You have to stick to the game plan and be positive in your attitude."

His advice to other batsmen was to play the ball as late as possible in such conditions.

"In such conditions, a batsman has to try and play the ball as late as possible against the spinners. If you commit yourself to a stroke early, it can become risky," he added.