Bitten by a rat on train in 2012, awaiting compensation in 2016

  • Ramesh Babu, Hindustan Times, Thiruvananthapuram
  • Updated: Feb 17, 2016 07:38 IST
An Indian railways worker cleans a coach prior to the trial run of a high-speed train between New Delhi and Agra is flagged off at New Delhi railway station. (AFP Photo)

A sharp pain on his right thumb woke up Kerala resident CJ Bush from a deep slumber, just in time to spot a large rat scurry out of the berth below him inside an AC coach of a premier train.

A consumer forum ordered Indian Railways last year to pay the Gulf returnee Rs 13,000 as compensation for his 2012 ordeal.

Bush says he plans to move to a higher court as he is yet to receive the money. “I was not ready to file a complaint against the railways initially. But their attitude really hurt me,” the 54-year-old told HT on Tuesday.

Passengers on the Mumbai-Ernakulam Duronto Express approached the ticket examiner (TTE) as Bush was bleeding profusely. He received first aid but says the TTE told him it wouldn’t be possible to halt the non-stop train and take him to a hospital. So, he was forced to continue the journey for 15 more hours.

“When I reached Ernakulam, I was denied medical assistance and many senior (railways) employees cross-examined me and asked me to prove that it was a rat bite,” he said, alleging that he was told to provide a medical certificate as evidence.

Bush says he paid a lot of money receiving treatment at a private hospital.

He later approached the consumer forum of Kerala’s Kottayam district seeking Rs 1 lakh as restitution. The tribunal ordered the railways to pay Rs 10,000 as compensation and Rs 3,000 against court expenses. “I fought a three-year-long legal battle but the railways are yet to admit their folly,” Bush said, adding that he will approach a higher court this week. “It is not a big amount for me, but they can’t take passengers for a ride.”

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