Indian woman among 16 killed in Yemen | india | Hindustan Times
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Indian woman among 16 killed in Yemen

india Updated: Sep 18, 2008 01:23 IST
Ramesh Babu & Agencies
Ramesh Babu & Agencies
Hindustan Times
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An Indian woman was among 16 people killed in a two suicide car bombings and a gun-battle at the main gate of the US embassy in the Yemeni capital Sanaa on Wednesday.

Rani Krishnan Nair (26), a trainee nurse at a private hospital in Sanaa, died in the attack along with six Yemeni soldiers and three other civilians. Six attackers were also killed.

“She was hit by a bullet and died on the spot,” an Indian embassy official in Sanaa told PTI over phone.
Nair, hailing from Kerala, was on her way to hospital when she was caught in the cross-fire that followed the bombing outside the heavily fortified embassy, six months after one of its residential compounds came under a rocket attack.

Nair’s mother is also a nurse at a hospital in the Yemeni capital, the embassy official said. “We are in touch with the family,” he said.

Relatives in shock back home

Pall of gloom descended on Manakkad village in Thodupuza (Idukki district) after the news trickled in that one of their natives, on Wednesday.

Rani was on her way to the hospital when she was caught in the crossfire followed by the bomb attack, her brother settled in Kuwait informed her family members back home.

“We received the shocking news this afternoon. Her brother told us that she received many bullet injuries on her head. Her body is still lying in the military hospital in Sanaa. We were told that it would be released only on Saturday,” Rani’s aunt Usha Nair told the Hindustan Times.

However the family members are yet to get any information from the Ministry of External Affairs.

Daughter of Prasad Krishanan Nair and Pushpa Nair Rani had come to Yemen only six months ago. Though most of her family members are settled in West Asia now, Rani had her education in her native place and later in Bangalore.

Her mother, Pushpa, is a nursing superintendent with a leading hospital in Kuwait.

“She was with us during her school and college days. A brilliant and bubbly girl we can’t believe this. We have no idea whether the body would brought here or not,” an inconsolable aunt said. Her father had built a modest house in their native place only recently.