Industry cries over its crores | india | Hindustan Times
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Industry cries over its crores

With hundreds of crores riding on one of their favourite actors, industry-wallahs are, expectedly, ruing the five-year prison sentence to Salman Khan in the chinkara poaching case.

india Updated: Apr 11, 2006 02:13 IST

The Hindi film industry is in shock. With hundreds of crores riding on one of their favourite actors, industry-wallahs are, expectedly, ruing the five-year prison sentence to Salman Khan in the chinkara poaching case.

Producer of the super hit Salman-starrer Tere Naam Sunil Manchanda hopes "he won't he held guilty by a higher court. In any case, I think the punishment far exceeds his crime."

Trade expert Taran Adarsh expects most Khan's films, in various stages of production, to suffer. "Be it Salaam-E-Ishq, God Tussi Great Ho or Jaaneman, each one is likely to suffer." Manchanda adds, "Though I don't know if it's 200 or 400 crores that are at stake, a lot is definitely riding on him."

A family friend says the actor wasn't aware what was coming. "He had gone to Jodhpur for the court hearing, little expecting a verdict would be given. But even the police knew about it and had an arrest warrant ready. Salman didn't even get even a hint of it."

With Tuesday being a bank holiday for Mahavir Jayanti, the courts will remain closed. His lawyers can neither file an appeal in the higher court nor apply for bail, the friend said.

Another friend complained: "People have gone scot-free in so many serious crimes like the Jessica Lall murder case. Hunting animals is a crime, but Salman is being judged too harshly because the law-enforcers want to make an example of him."

Ravi Chopra, Salman’s friend and director of Baabul thinks "It's not such a great crime that he can't file an appeal in the higher court and apply for bail, a procedure that's permitted by law. He is too nice a guy to be treated like a criminal. He's just paying for being a celebrity, which is very unfair."