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Infantry the key to achieving success

Infantry day was celebrated in the Bhopal Military Station on October 27. Infantry is an arm of close combat, with the role of closing in with the enemy to ensure his defeat. This makes infantry the most indispensable and ultimate combat arm for achieving victory in war.

india Updated: Oct 30, 2006 16:29 IST

Infantry day was celebrated in the Bhopal Military Station on October 27. Infantry is an arm of close combat, with the role of closing in with the enemy to ensure his defeat. This makes infantry the most indispensable and ultimate combat arm for achieving victory in war.

In the modern era of low-intensity conflict operations, infantry, with its versatility and ability to achieve results under all adversities, has proved to be the key arm to achieve success. It is not conceivable to conduct operations in low-intensity conflict and counter-insurgency (CI) without this combat arm.

Even in this age of hi-tech weaponry, it is an accepted fact that the foot soldier is the one who ultimately “delivers”. All the aerial bombardment, missiles, rockets and unlimited firepower only tame the adversary. Victory is established only when the Infantryman stamps his boot on the ground and raises the national flag on captured territory.

The Indian frontiers remain in the hands of the Infantrymen who operate from Siachen Glacier and the impregnable jungles of the North-East to the scorching heat of the Thar Desert.

The low-intensity conflict operations have been a constant and often the most prolonged operations for the Army. Insurgencies in the North-East, Jammu and Kashmir and, in the recent past, Punjab have been the live examples of Infantry-centric operations which are characteristically complex, delicate and sensitive. Indian Infantry formations and units came out with flying colors in UN peacekeeping operations in Somalia, Rwanda, Angola, Sierra Leone and, more recently, in Lebanon, Ethiopia, Eritrea.

Infantry Day was celebrated with great fanfare at The Infantry School at Mhow. Numerous week-long functions were held to mark the occasion.  The functions were attended by all the serving and retired infantrymen. Commandant Infantry School congratulated all infantrymen on the occasion.

Diwali and Id celebrated at DSOI
A special social evening, to mark the Diwali and Id celebrations was organised on October 20 at the Defence Services Officer’s Institute (DSOI). The evening started with the firecracker show which enlivened the spirits of one and all especially the children.

The highlight of the evening was the two rounds of ‘Bumper Tambola’. The excitement among contestant could be felt all over with blessings of “Laxmi” shifting positions for each prize, which were shared in some cases. After the exhilarating rounds of Tambola, everybody boogied to the footapping live music. The evening ended with the draw of raffle with large number of prizes.

To the wives left behind
To our wives whom we love,Who always get left behind.

Please know that you are thought of,You’re always on our minds.

As we march along the borders,And pull into different posts The first thing we go hunting for, Are trinkets of all sorts.

Something to surprise you with, On the awaited home coming day,To let you know we thought of you, At each post along the way.

Some days we barely get a break, And we work until days end. But when we lay in our racks at night, Please know, our love we send.

Our deployments may be long, And the end is hard to see, But soon dear wives of ours, In our arms you soon will be.
                                                                -Contributed by Capt S Chandra

Did you know?
The Military Schools were formerly known as King George VI Royal Indian Military Colleges and later in 1952 these schools were recognized on Public School lines, made the members of the Indian Public School Conference (IPSC) and came to be known as King George Schools. Their objectives were enlarged and admissions were thrown open to the sons of Defence Service Officers as well as to the civilians. The present name- “Military Schools” was acquired in 1965.

There are five Military Schools in India located at Chail (HP), Ajmer, Dholpur (Rajasthan), Bangalore and Belgaum (Karnataka). Here a cadet grows up to be agile in physical activities, alert in mental application besides being ingenious, resourceful, preserving, disciplined, self-reliant, self confident, optimistic & trustworthy. Going with its previous name, the students are still referred to as ‘Georgians’.

Columnist can be reached at ambreen2you@gmail.com/ambreen2you@yahoo.co.in