IT, management emerge as hot favourites | india | Hindustan Times
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IT, management emerge as hot favourites

Defying the economic downturn and shrinking job opportunities in the information technology (IT) sector, B Sc (IT) emerged as the top favourite for students seeking admission to degree college, report Snehal Rebello & Serena Menon.

india Updated: Jun 18, 2009 01:28 IST

Defying the economic downturn and shrinking job opportunities in the information technology (IT) sector, B. Sc (IT) emerged as the top favourite for students seeking admission to degree college.

The course registered highest cut-offs across city colleges, followed by Bachelor of Accounts & Finance Management Studies (BAF) and Bachelor of Management Studies (BMS).

Institutes that do not offer BSc (IT) are realising the popularity of the subject.

“We received many enquiries about BSc (IT) throughout the year,” said Kirti Narain, principal, Jai Hind College.

Narain said the college was planning to start the course in a couple of years. “Students feel there is scope for lucrative careers in the field.”

“This is the next best option for students unsuccessful in qualifying for engineering,” said Majula Desai, principal of National College.

But she also said that many of these students with scores above 90 per cent leave within first few months to private engineering colleges.

At Ruparel College, BSc (IT) had the highest cut-off followed by St Xavier’s and SIES Colleges.

The other top course was BAF at HR College with a cut-off of 91.2 per cent followed by KC College and SIES College with 86 and 83.2 per cent respectively.

Besides IT, computer science, financial markets, accounts & finance, banking & insurance, biochemistry, biotechnology, mass media and management studies courses were high in demand.

On Wednesday, the first list of all colleges was made public. On day one, while institutes largely admitted their own junior college students, some toppers also secured seats.

A section of students alleged that some colleges like HR College of Commerce & Economics were ‘unofficially’ reserving seats for their own junior college students for the unaided courses, which according to N Venkatramani, registrar of Mumbai University, was not allowed.

“The college has kept around 14 to 18 seats reserved for in-house students,” said a student not wishing to be named.

But Rekha Bahadur, vice-principal of HR College said, “We haven’t done anything wrong. We have read the circular from the university.”