It should be fun and Games now without the Queen | india | Hindustan Times
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It should be fun and Games now without the Queen

The Queen of England’s refusal to attend the 2010 Commonwealth Games’ inauguration ceremony should be good news for the authorities for two reasons (God save the prez, The Pundit, June 1).

india Updated: Jun 02, 2010 22:24 IST

It should be fun and Games now without the Queen
The Queen of England’s refusal to attend the 2010 Commonwealth Games’ inauguration ceremony should be good news for the authorities for two reasons (God save the prez, The Pundit, June 1). First, it relieves the Delhi police of the burden of deploying additional personnel for the Queen’s security. Second, considering that we are still unsure of whether the Delhi government will be able to pull off the mega-event, the Queen’s decision has saved us from embarrassment in front of the head of the Commonwealth.
Manu Kumar Lal, Gurgaon

Don’t dodge the questions, PM
Rajdeep Sardesai does a commendable job of asking those questions to the prime minister whose answers will help the common man evaluate the UPA’s performance (Manmohanji, sir…, Beyond the Byte, May 28). Despite being in power for half a decade now, the UPA has failed to resolve various problems like corruption, Naxalism, rising food prices, et al. The PM and his ministers can no longer hope that issues will be solved on their own. The prime minister must answer the questions raised by Sardesai.
N. Kavita Kumar, Jamshedpur

A host of lessons on winning
Suresh Kalmadi in Benefits of games will be felt for longer than 15 days (Games Notes, May 29) recounts the importance of the Commonwealth Games for the nation, but doesn’t say a word on whether the benefit of playing host will reflect on India’s medal tally. Our sports bodies should learn from Australia, which hosted the 2006 Commonwealth Games. Being the host did not stop Oz sports bodies from focusing on their athletes’ training. The result was astounding, as Australia topped the tally with a total of 221 medals.
Surendra Bhargava, Delhi

Initiating a cycle of problems
With reference to the editorial Peddle a silly idea (The Pundit, May 28), replacing cycle rickshaws with electronic versions will create more problems than the Municipal Corporation of Delhi’s (MCD) decision aims to solve. The cycle rickshaw-pullers will be left jobless and commuters will be left with no affordable means of transport for short distances. If the MCD feels that cycle rickshaws lead to traffic congestion, it should make dedicated rickshaw lanes and cap the number of rickshaws in each area.
Subhash C. Shukla, via email

A strong policy on policing
This refers to the editorial At the heart of darkness (Our Take, May 31). The indiscriminate killing of security personnel and people over the years, coupled with the recent cold-blooded murder of around 150 passengers of the Gyaneshwari Express in West Bengal affirms that the Maoists’ agenda of securing the rights of helpless adivasis has gone awry. As the editorial rightly states, the only solution is for the central and state governments to “forge a policy — a military one, if need be — to demonstrate that acts of Maoist violence will not be tolerated, and there will be consequences for making targets of the people of India.”
R.K. Malhotra, Delhi

An Ambani overdose
The report Anil halts at Mukesh’s Tirupati guesthouse (May 31) highlights the media’s obsession with frivolity. By now, readers know almost everything about the Ambani brothers, right from their eating habits to their reading ones and, of course, their travelling plans. So what’s next? Perhaps reading about which brother will get the more expensive birthday gift from mother Kokilaben Ambani.
Shankar Garg, via email