Jallikattu claims three lives in TN | india | Hindustan Times
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Jallikattu claims three lives in TN

Three bull fighters were killed and 30 others injured on Friday in the traditional 'Jallikattu' (taming the bull) organised as part of Pongal festivities in Tamila Nadu.

india Updated: Jan 16, 2009 22:47 IST

Three bull fighters were killed and 30 others injured on Friday in the traditional 'Jallikattu' (taming the bull) organised as part of Pongal festivities in Tamila Nadu, with officials claiming that Supreme Court's directives were violated at one of the venues. The bull fighters were killed at Palakurichi near Tiruchirappalli and those injured had gathered at Alanganallur in Madurai district, official sources said.

Five people were injured at Avaniyapuram on Wednesday while 25 others were wounded on Thursday at Palamedu, police said.

Officials said Jallikattu was not conducted in accordance with the Supreme Court instructions at Palakurichi.

Medical facilities were not sufficient and the sharp horns of the bulls had not been blunted as per the guidelines.

200 bulls from Dindigul, Madurai and Sivaganga were used in the game and 100 players participated at Tiruchirappalli while a 900 bulls were into the ring and 500 bull fighters took part in the event at Alanganallur, official sources said.

The winners were provided with prizes including, gold and silver coins, cash, TV sets and refrigerator, they said.

The organisers had last year fought a legal battle to overcome a ban on the event. The Supreme Court had permitted the event while laying down guidelines to ensure safety of the animals, competitors and onlookers.

However, the Animal Welfare Board of India last week filed a fresh application in the Supreme Court seeking a ban on Jallikattu, alleging that the state government and the organisers committed contempt of court by failing to comply with the court's guidelines. Over the years, the ancient sport has claimed more than 400 lives.