Jammu man goes missing on visit to Pakistani Kashmir | india | Hindustan Times
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Jammu man goes missing on visit to Pakistani Kashmir

Sakina Bi comes every on Monday to Chakan-da-Bagh near Poonch, the crossing point at the Line of Control between India and Pakistan in Kashmir, to check if her husband Mohammad Hussain has returned from Pakistan-administered Kashmir where he had gone to meet his brother in March.

india Updated: Jul 13, 2009 17:40 IST

Sakina Bi comes every on Monday to Chakan-da-Bagh near Poonch, the crossing point at the Line of Control (LOC) between India and Pakistan in Kashmir, to check if her husband Mohammad Hussain has returned from Pakistan-administered Kashmir where he had gone to meet his brother in March.

"I come here every Monday to see if my husband has returned from Pakistan," Sakina, 50, told IANS over telephone from Poonch.

Hussain, 55, resident of Kerni village in mountainous Poonch district in Jammu and Kashmir, had gone to meet his brother Fateh Mohammad in Bajri village in Pakistan-administered Kashmir, on March 2 on a 45-day permit and was scheduled to return April 13.

According to Sakina, her husband used to call regularly from across the border and he even called two days before he was scheduled to return. His family came to the crossing point April 13 but to their shock, he was not among the returning passengers. Since then, his family has had no contact with him.

A helpless Sakina now comes to Chakan-da-Bagh every Monday, the day when passengers cross over between both sides - to check if her husband has returned.

"I don't know what has happened to my husband but bad thoughts are coming to my mind always," she said.

Mother of five children with no means of livelihood, Sakina has also approached the district administration for help. "I am begging from people around for providing bread to my children," she said.

Additional Deputy Commissioner of Poonch Rattan Lal told IANS that the administration had received Sakina's complaint and was trying to trace her missing husband.

"Usually the intelligence wings are asked to provide inputs in such cases," he said.