June rains 14 lawsuits on LDA | india | Hindustan Times
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June rains 14 lawsuits on LDA

THE COURTS maybe under summer recess but there is hardly any respite for the LDA, which has been beleaguered by a string of PIL/writ petitions of late, some of which appear to be more personal in nature rather than in public interest.

india Updated: Jun 19, 2006 00:13 IST

THE COURTS maybe under summer recess but there is hardly any respite for the LDA, which has been beleaguered by a string of PIL/writ petitions of late, some of which appear to be more personal in nature rather than in public interest.

The development agency, which is yet to recover from some of the better-known legal wrangles on plot allotments/land acquisition in the Supreme Court, has been bombarded with over a dozen lawsuits in June alone. “According to information, 14 writ petitions/PILs have been moved against the LDA in June so far,” said a lawyer on the department’s legal panel.  

So are the litigations a reflection on LDA’s performance or the lack of it, as city’s development regulator? Or is it that the civic agency has just become a whipping boy for some publicity seekers? The truth perhaps, lies somewhere in between the two. Of the 14-odd recent lawsuits, at least two have been in the news earlier also because of the high-profile nature of those involved. While the first is against the reported shifting of the UP Badminton Academy building adjacent to the Lohia Park in Gomti Nagar to some other place and the second relates to a huge chunk of land given to a private real estate developer on Sultanpur Road.

Then there are some self-appointed ‘residents’ welfare committees’ that claim to champion the cause of environment and voice their concern from time to time over the alleged depleting green cover and conversion of park and green belt land in the city. But while these plethora of litigations may have become too much of a bother for officials, who have to divide time between office and court, for the ‘men-in-black’ it is a welcome break even in vacation.