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Juvenile justice

Harsh Mander in Loss of innocence (July 24) presents an emotive picture of the issue of treating juvenile offenders.

india Updated: Jul 29, 2007 23:21 IST

Harsh Mander in Loss of innocence (July 24) presents an emotive picture of the issue of treating juvenile offenders. But humane treatment may not prove fruitful in all cases. The offender mentioned in the article was let off on the grounds of his guilty plea, but a mere feeling of guilt cannot guarantee that he would be a law-abiding citizen in future. Improving the conditions in observation homes and providing a better life to the offender is subjective.

Tanushree Goyal, Delhi

II

There are many children like Rahul who require help. Many small girls are forced to do housework and are exposed to all sorts of abuse. Many of them are led astray and land in jail. If these children are made aware of the laws that are supposed to protect them, many crimes could be prevented.

Avi Saini, Jaipur

Women’s worth

The report Kiran Bedi: PM has let me down (July 26) is shocking. The government has often ignored seniority and merit when it comes to the appointment of women officers in key positions. While the Congress president and the PM always boast about women’s rights, not appointing Bedi as police chief, speaks volumes about the State’s intentions.

S Raghavan, via e-mail

Disorderly conduct

Apropos of the editorial Two to tangle (July 25), nothing can improve our legislatures till all proceedings are made public. Legislative proceedings should be subjected to the law of the land to avoid misuse of privileges. Only then can we avoid violent scenes in Parliament and state assemblies.

Madhu Agrawal, Delhi

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