Karthikeyan to sit out first British GP practice session | india | Hindustan Times
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Karthikeyan to sit out first British GP practice session

india Updated: Jun 29, 2012 22:57 IST

Agencies
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HRT reserve driver Dani Clos will take the wheels from India’s Narain Karthikeyan for the opening practise session of the Formula One British Grand Prix here next weekend.

Spanish driver Clos will step into the F112 for the second time in the season after the Barcelona round last month. He will accompany Pedro de la Rosa for the first 90 minutes of practice at the iconic circuit with Karthikeyan taking over for the remainder of the weekend.

“I am very happy to step into the F112 once again, a place where I have got good memories since I have made the podium every time I have been in GP2. After Barcelona I have really been looking forward to this new opportunity,” said Clos.

Hamilton looks to recover from ‘blip’
London: McLaren’s Lewis Hamilton has written off his Valencia run-in with Pastor Maldonado as merely a blip in what he hopes will be a winning season.
Looking forward to a home British Grand Prix at Silverstone next week, the 2008 Formula One world champion told Reuters Television in an interview that he had put the controversy behind him and had moved on.
“I just move forward. It’s in the past, it doesn’t really matter now,” Hamilton said at a London event for sponsors Santander.

Uphill struggle for possible London GP
London: London’s prospects of hosting a street circuit Formula One Grand Prix around the capital’s most iconic landmarks were given a temporary boost this week when Spanish bank Santander unveiled a video of its plans that was widely aired and circulated.

But behind the hype and the gloss, there was little of substance to support the long-held view that a London Grand Prix is anything more than a dream - a fantasy that would need political support and great financial backing to become established and permanent.

The support of Britons Lewis Hamilton and Jenson Button of McLaren was as obvious and predictable as the over-hyped presentation and left few seasoned observers, many of whom have been cynical for years, with much doubt regarding the logistical nightmare involved in bringing London to a halt.