Kasab's admissions not a confession: Lawyer | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Aug 19, 2017-Saturday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Kasab's admissions not a confession: Lawyer

Pakistani terrorist Ajmal Amir Kasab's admissions about the 26/11 Mumbai terror attacks before the Special Court over the past two days do not amount to a confession, his lawyer Abbas Kazmi said.

india Updated: Jul 27, 2009 16:32 IST

Pakistani terrorist Mohammed Ajmal Amir alias Kasab's admissions about the 26/11 Mumbai terror attacks before the Special Court over the past two days do not amount to a confession, his government appointed lawyer S G Abbas Kazmi said in Mumbai on Tuesday.

Kazmi addressed mediapersons after coming out of the court, which adjourned the matter to Wednesday, and said Kasab's admissions were in response to a query on Monday by Special Judge M L Tahilyani on why he wanted to plead guilty.

He also claimed that Kasab was being "mentally tortured" by the police. The lawyer added that Kasab said that duty officers had informed him of how Pakistan had admitted he was their national and that cases were being pursued in the neighbouring country in the Mumbai terror attacks case.

Kazmi said Kasab's revelation of the presence of an Indian link named Abu Jundal needed to be probed "seriously" by the investigating agencies and the prosecution.

Countering this, Special Public Prosecutor Ujjwal Nikam accused the defence of adopting delay tactics to prolong the trial.

"In the last three months, we have examined 135 witnesses and want to complete the trial as soon as possible. If the prosecution had not delayed the trial, we could have finished it long ago," Nikam said.

He said that he would discuss Kasab's confessions with police officials about whether he had revealed all details about the terror attacks, if his crimes are proved and what kind of punishment should be demanded.

"We shall put forth our arguments on this before the court tomorrow (on Wednesday) after discussing the issue with police officials," Nikam said.

Special Judge Tahilyani had earlier on Tuesday barred the media from reporting on some portions of Kasab's confessional statements after he revealed the intentions behind the Nov 26, 2008 terror attacks on Mumbai.

After he spoke about the motives, Tahilyani passed the order restraining the media from reporting it on the ground that it could create communal disharmony in the country.

Kasab on Tuesday revealed more details of the attack at Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus (CST) along with his associate Abu Ismail. Tahilyani adjourned the matter following Kasab's admissions.

In a dramatic twist to the ongoing trial, Kasab on Monday confessed in the court to his involvement in the 26/11 terror attacks in this financial capital. He admitted he is a Pakistani national and also recounted in full detail how he and his nine associates - all killed by the police during the 60-hour long combined security operations - carried out the terror mayhem.

He also revealed before the stunned courtroom names of his Pakistani handlers.