KGMU catches hold of umbilical cure-all | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Oct 21, 2017-Saturday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

KGMU catches hold of umbilical cure-all

IF EVERYTHING goes right King George?s Medical University would soon start preserving umbilical cord blood for fighting diseases like cancer.

india Updated: Mar 30, 2006 00:28 IST

IF EVERYTHING goes right King George’s Medical University would soon start preserving umbilical cord blood for fighting diseases like cancer.

It would be the first to start such a facility in Uttar Pradesh.

The proposal has been drafted by the KGMU after Government allocated a budget of Rs 6 crores for cord blood harvesting.

A request in this connection has been made to the State Government with the proposal for establishing a blood bank.

Cord blood relates to use of blood found in a child’s umbilical cord is collected for future use. Parents can choose to store cord blood at a private bank, or to donate the cord blood to a public cord blood bank.

“Inside the child’s umbilical cord blood are stem cells. These cells can help treat a growing number of diseases and disorders, like leukemia and sickle cell anemia. If you bank your child’s cord blood, the stem cells found in the blood can help your child in the future in treating a disease,” said Dr Mukh Ram Singh Kushwaha, the head of the department of pathology.

Presently Reliance Life Sciences and some other private companies are facilitating stem cell banking but with KGMU entering the list it would be the first in the State.

“There is 150 ml cord blood of which 50 ml can be preserved for future needs.

With the red blood cells separation, the mono-nuclear cells are formed through the process of isolation and purification,” said Kushwaha.

It may be mentioned that the pathology department of KGMU is among the few that have the facility to separate blood components, like plasma and RBC, which is the future need for treatment of patients of medicine, general surgery and trauma and also to manage gap in the demand and supply of blood.