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Less popular colleges pack a punch

?Less popular? colleges of DU are riding a new popularity crest, thanks to good courses and state-of-art facilities provided by them.

india Updated: Jun 14, 2006 12:04 IST

‘Less popular’ colleges of Delhi University are riding a new popularity crest, thanks to good courses and state-of-art facilities provided by them. And contrary to popular belief, students are opting for these courses out of choice and not lack of it.

Some of these colleges are Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences (BCAS), Acharya Narendra Dev (AN Dev) and Atma Ram Sanatan Dharm (ARSD). 

  Choices
for biomedical science

AN Dev, BCAS and Shaheed

Rajguru College

for applied psychology

Vivekananda College

and Sri Aurobindo

DDU

for state-of-the-art facilities

and upgraded laboratory

for industrial chemistry

Rajdhani and Deshbandhu


Last year, some 3,000 students took the common admission test for the 90 biomedical sciences seats on offer at AN Dev, BCAS and Shaheed Rajguru College of Applied Science for Women.



“Our applied sciences course has a compulsory industry training of eight weeks in the second and third year,” said Shaheed Rajguru principal S. Lakshmi Devi. “The comprehensive training and course gives students entry into the best companies and research institutes.”



The college provides Bachelors of Applied Science in Electronics, Food Technology and Instrumentation. “A number of the quality assurance people employed by the food industry are our alumni,” said Lakshmi Devi. Deshbandhu College is one of the four DU colleges providing B.Sc. (honours) in biochemistry.



“We have one of the best science faculty,” claims principal A.P. Raste. “On campus colleges have their own charm, but students should not miss out on good courses because a college like ours is not situated in the main campus.”



The college is planning to introduce Business Economics and Mass Communication from next year to attract more students. “Both the courses are industry oriented and not many colleges have them,” said Raste.



From 71 per cent in 1998, the B.Com. (honours) third cut-off at Deen Dayal Upadhyay College (DDU) had gone up to 83 per cent in 2005. “Commerce and computer science are the two most sought after course at DDU,” said principal Suresh K. Garg.