Let’s make this Deepawali unforgettable for others | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jun 27, 2017-Tuesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Let’s make this Deepawali unforgettable for others

Deepawali used to be festival of lights some years ago. But, today, it has become a tamasha. Noisy crackers disturb the peace and pollute our environment.

india Updated: Oct 16, 2009 20:59 IST

Let’s make this Deepawali unforgettable for others
Deepawali used to be festival of lights some years ago. But, today, it has become a tamasha. Noisy crackers disturb the peace and pollute our environment. People, especially teenagers, should understand the significance of this festival and spread the peaceful message of Deepawali through love and friendship. Instead of wasting money on crackers, let us use that amount to bring a smile to the faces of those who don't have anyone to celebrate the festival with. May the festival of lights be the harbinger of joy and prosperity for everyone.
Cajetan Peter D’Souza, Mumbai

At the art of the matter
Kudos to Kaushik Basu for highlighting the problems that art and culture in India face today (Listen to your art, The Visible Hand, October 10). It is sad to see that in a culturally rich nation like ours, art is slowly dying. The global economic recession has hit the art industry severely. But, with no dearth of either talent or resources, and with the right attitude, India can initiate something of a renaissance. The media, too, can help rescue the industry from the economic doldrums. The government needs to come to the artists’ rescue by promoting them in other countries. The Centre’s recent decision to open more Indian cultural centres across the globe is a welcome step.
Siddharth Bhattacharya, Delhi

II
Kaushik Basu’s article is an eye-opener for those whose penchant for art and culture has been overtaken by materialism. Basu’s view that the media can play a big role in getting artists their due is right. Instead of promoting the big artists, the press should promote those who get no publicity and require an appropriate platform to exhibit their talent. Parents should encourage their children to make a career in arts.
Sunny Mitra, Kolkata

Move on the basis of need
The issue of migration, as stated by Pratik Kanjilal in Destination well-known (Speakeasy, October 10), misses out the minor, yet important, changes that the problem brings along with it. Migration of people to a few areas widens the gap between the developed and underdeveloped areas. While the host state prospers, the hometown suffers due to a lack of skilled labour. The government should regulate migration on the basis of need and the availability of resources in various states. This will lead to uniform development over the entire country.
Neha Shankar, Anand

A befitting reply, finally
Irrespective of New Delhi’s attitude towards Beijing, China will always be inimical to India (India hits back at China, October 15). We have always equated our claim on Arunachal Pradesh with China’s presence in Pakistan-occupied Kashmir (PoK). This is a big mistake, for if tomorrow, China agrees to cut off its ties with Pakistan, will we follow suit and give Arunachal Pradesh to Beijing? This ambiguity is helping both China and Pakistan in exploiting the current situation. The Centre should act tough and make both our neighbouring nations realise that both territories were, are and will be part of India.
R.L. Raichandani, via email

II
Finally, India has mustered some courage to express its unhappiness over China’s projects in PoK. China wants to strain its relationship with India to expand its territory and retain its status as the strongest Asian country. The only way to hit back is to internationalise the Tibet issue and stir up internal trouble for China, which will keep it occupied until we strengthen our forces.
Venkata Bindu, via email