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Letters @ hindustantimes.com

Much has been written about the Indo-US nuclear deal. India’s newly empowered elite finds that the frustrating political process threatens its global aspirations...

india Updated: Jul 13, 2008 22:51 IST

Forces behind the nuclear force

Much has been written about the Indo-US nuclear deal. India’s newly empowered elite finds that the frustrating political process threatens its global aspirations. This has brought together powerful interests ranging from India Inc. to the NRI lobby together. These forces are strong enough to push the government to its own collapse. The message conveyed to the G8 by the Prime Minister was that India is ruled by a government that is willing to make brave decisions. But the recent actions of the UPA can also be seen as a worrying shrinkage of the space meant for democratic dissent.

Md Ziyaullah Khan,
Pune

II

The withdrawal of support by the Left to the UPA government was expected. The support from the Samajwadi Party and the ‘national interest’ justification given by Amar Singh makes for a nice little comedy where two bitter enemies are now seen scratching each other’s backs. But with inflation riding high and elections nearing, the two Singhs — Mulayam and Amar — will not bat an eyelid before they pull the rug from under the UPA’s feet.

Shrikant Jaimini,
via email

III

It is regrettable that many experts in the media are describing the Left as irresponsible, obdurate and anti-reforms. At a time when many political parties don’t think twice before buying MPs, it is to the credit of the Left that its MPs have remained steadfast in their resolve. They deserve to be saluted.

VK Marwah,
via email

Obscurantist obstacles

Apropos of the editorial Feeding the Muslim stereotype (July 12), the cases of Imrana and Salma both deal with derogatory fatwas from obscure institutions like the Darul Uloom Deoband. Such institutions never want to take care of the basic needs of society like literacy and health. Instead they always take the easiest way out and keep their ‘flock’ under their thumb. It’s time they were made to come under the law of the land.

Taiyab Alam,
Delhi

From the army to the office With reference to the report Lady officers now battle in boardrooms (July 11), it is unfortunate that women officers do not have the permanent commission facility in the Indian Army. it is not only the money factor and the accompanying perks but also the growth prospects in the private sector that is making women officers leave the Army in droves. With their disciplined background, these women officers are sure to shine in the competitive environment that the private sector offers.

Bal Govind,
Bareilly