Made to order | india | Hindustan Times
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Made to order

Thin may not be the norm any longer in the fashion world, but sleek, slender and compact still rules home décor.

india Updated: Mar 27, 2010 00:41 IST
Chetna Joshi Bambroo

Thin may not be the norm any longer in the fashion world, but sleek, slender and compact still rules home décor. With homes increasingly feeling lack of space, more and more people are opting for customised furniture, which can be tweaked and designed to fit in a less space.

Be innovative
“The best part of customised furniture is that one can have whatever design and style of furniture one wants. One can experiment with the looks and designs and the choice of material and sizes according to space,” says Poonam Kalra of I’m Centre for Applied Arts.

So much so that the customised look is fast replacing readymade furniture. “Since people want to give a touch of their personality/creativity to the home, they want the furniture too, to show their sense of aesthetics,” says Bindu Vadera of Varya. With designers and stores ready to materialise your dream design one can get anything made, keeping the limited space in mind. “CD-cum-book racks, cupboards, side tables, shoe racks can be designed keeping multi-functionality in mind,” says Amitabh Bendre of Evok.

Risk factor
Having customised furniture at your place surely comes for a price, as compared to the readymade buy. “The price depends on the size and quality and finish. And because the furniture items are made on order — the choices are endless,” says Vadera.

But this reflection of an individual’s personality has its drawbacks. “In readymade furniture you can see and feel what you are buying, but customised furniture involves a certain amount of risk in the terms of the final look. The final product can turn out to be entirely different from what the buyer has visualised. So, it’s very important to get the furniture made from a designer you have confidence in and whose work you are acquainted with,” says Kalra.