Mamata Banerjee is indulging in petty playground politics | india | Hindustan Times
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Mamata Banerjee is indulging in petty playground politics

With reference to the editorial, the gamine in her (The Pundit, September 24), political rivalry must not outstrip ideological rivalry in a democracy.

india Updated: Sep 26, 2010 21:45 IST

Mamata Banerjee is indulging in petty playground politics

With reference to the editorial, the gamine in her (The Pundit, September 24), political rivalry must not outstrip ideological rivalry in a democracy. Mamata Banerjee committed a grave mistake by not inviting West Bengal CM Buddhadeb Bhattacharjee to the foundation-laying ceremony of a new Metro line in Kolkata. Unfortunately, there is no dearth of churlish politicians in the country. Gone are the days when political rivalry didn’t cross the line of public decency. Today, no-holds-barred rivalries are commonplace, bringing shame to our democracy.

S.D. Sahay, Delhi

Son-rise over Bihar

The report Lalu’s son to succeed him (September 24) shows that India is heading towards a hereditary oligarchy. Before Lalu, Mulayam Singh had done the same thing by anointing his son as his successor, as did Farooq Abdullah and M. Karunanidhi. Sycophants are working overtime to perpetuate the Gandhi dynasty at the Centre, and democracy seems to have found an easy way of settling succession issues. The right thing would be to let these youngsters earn the respect of the people through their hard work and sincerity at the grassroots.

R.J. Khurana, Bhopal

II

In India, politics is not the prerogative of the aam aadmi. Indian democracy is the monopoly of a handful of politically-powerful families, leading to much public frustration with the State. When Sardar Patel made an effort to integrate sundry Indian states, which came into existence after the fall of the Mughal empire, he too was working against this hereditary principle. It’s against democracy and is bound to weaken India in the long run.

B.M. Lall, via email

Let’s be good sports now

With reference to the report Fixing the games mess (September 24), I’ve no doubt that the Commonwealth Games will be a success despite the incompetence, arrogance, greed and lack of sensitivity of the organisers. It is for us ordinary Indians to ensure that our guests take back fond memories of a fortnight well spent. We can hang the culprits later. It is time to overcome our ambivalence and concentrate on contributing our bit toward making the Games a success. It will ultimately be the inherent buoyancy of Indian hospitality that will win the day.

Hirendra Chatterjee, Delhi

Let down by the leaders

After the Olympics in China, there was hope that India would follow suit and show its mettle to the world. Unfortunately, greedy and corrupt politicians and contractors put their pockets before national pride, reinforcing the unfortunate image of India as a corrupt Third World country in the eyes of the world. It is too late to undo the damage but the government must take strong action against those who let the country and its people down.

Suchitra, London

Identifying the real targets

Samar Halarnkar in Nandan’s new deal (Maha Bharat, September 23) has rightly stated that providing a unique identity card to every Indian is a Herculean task. But certain vested interests are bound to use this as a tool to extend the benefits to illegal migrants, solely to protect their votebanks. Nandan Nilekani should be allowed to freely determine the requisite criteria to target eligible candidates as this will keep corrupt politicians and officials at bay.

M.C. Bhardwaj, via email