Mani Shankar Aiyar got it right, India got its priorities wrong | india | Hindustan Times
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Mani Shankar Aiyar got it right, India got its priorities wrong

Lalita Panicker’s article People not like us (October 20) made for interesting reading.

india Updated: Oct 21, 2010 22:49 IST

Mani Shankar Aiyar got it right, India got its priorities wrong

Lalita Panicker’s article People not like us (October 20) made for interesting reading. But I wonder if the writer’s criticism of Mani Shankar Aiyar’s remarks on why India shouldn’t have played host to the Commonwealth Games is justified. Aiyar was not entirely wrong in arguing that India should get its priorities right and fight poverty and hunger before hosting a global sporting event. The amount spent on the Games could have been utilised in providing healthcare and accommodation facilities to the poor.

Vinod Tyagi, Delhi

It’s taking a toll on the drivers

A toll is required to be paid for a road that’s been properly maintained. But the National Delhi-Chandigarh highway, which runs through Panipat and Karnal, is neither complete nor in good condition. There are countless ‘diversions’ and potholes. Yet, motorists are charged R81 at one toll barrier, R20 at another and R26 at yet another one. If you enter Himachal Pradesh from Kalka, you are made to shell out R30 more for a road that is in a lamentable condition. In Maharashtra recently, following a public outcry over the poor condition of toll roads, the government was forced to stop charging toll till the roads were repaired. Shouldn’t the same be done for the Delhi-Chandigarh highway?

Rahul Singh, via email

Making giving easier in India

With reference to the editorial The giving’s not easy here (Our Take, October 19), many Indians wish to donate to their alma maters but are unable to because of bureaucratic procedures. Most foreign universities have a well-defined procedure to accept, monitor and utilise private donations. It’s time educational institutions in India work out a similar mechanism.

Krishan Chaudhuri, via email