McCain opposes military action against Pakistan | india | Hindustan Times
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McCain opposes military action against Pakistan

Republican Senator John McCain said he would press Pakistan to cooperate in the probe into the Mumbai terrorist strikes, but opposed military action against Islamabad, saying there was no hard evidence yet.

india Updated: Dec 03, 2008 00:10 IST
Tushar Srivastava

Republican Senator John McCain said he would press Pakistan to cooperate in the probe into the Mumbai terrorist strikes, but opposed military action against Islamabad, saying there was no hard evidence yet.

McCain, along with Senators Joe Liebermann and Lindsey Graham, called on PM Manmohan Singh on Tuesday and expressed solidarity with India in the wake of the terror attacks. “We would be meeting Pakistan General (Ashfaq) Kayani over the weekend and raise some questions with him,” Liebermann told reporters.

"I assume the government of Pakistan will cooperate. They realise that this act of terror is not something that affects India but all the civilised nations," McCain said at the US embassy.

"No", was his reply to a question whether the Mumbai attacks were a "fit case" for India to launch military action against Pakistan.

"We do not have hard evidence yet. Obviously, there are allegations that this organisation, this individual or this group were trained or operated or had some training in Pakistan," said McCain, who ran unsuccessfully in the last month's US presidential elections.

He told the PM the US was willing to cooperate and assist Indian investigating agencies to track down the perpetrators of the terrorist strikes.

The attacks, McCain said, had taken place at a time when the India-US relations were excellent and people were outraged over what happened in Mumbai and that he hoped the killers would be brought to justice. The senators left for Dhaka later in the evening.

“Ours is a mission of solidarity. This is an attack on the civilized world and this is exactly what we felt after 9/11. Extremism should not let divide us but should unite us,” Lieberman said.