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MCI team spots loopholes

india Updated: Nov 28, 2006 16:34 IST
Highlight Story

LIKE AN ill-prepared student on the day of final examination, the authorities and doctors on duty at M Y Hospital and MGM Medical College were found fumbling on several occasions on the first day of the Medical Council of India (MCI) team’s visit here on Monday.

The MCI team comprising Dr P N Agrawal, Dr C A Desai and Dr Shrivas, which arrived in the City on Sunday evening from Bhopal, reached the College and Hospital early this morning to embark on the inspection tour. Dr Shrivas and Dr Desai took the tour of M Y Hospital while Dr Agrawal remained at the MGM College.

At the outset, Dr Desai and Dr Shrivas spent some time in Superintendent Dr D K Jain’s chamber, where they asked Dr Jain and Dean Dr V K Saini about the posts they held. The two MCI members accompanied by Dr Jain, Dr Saini and senior faculty members then went ahead with the tour of the Hospital starting with OPD registration counter under full media glare.

There started the real test. In spite of cover-up attempts going on since the past few days, the team was able to spot the exact problems ailing the particular department. For instance, the authorities had put up new curtains in several departments during last few days but the team rightly pointed out the lack of a partition, if not a cabin at least a curtain, in the medicine OPD, which did not offer privacy to female patients.

One grave lacuna was mishandling of blood samples by nursing and paramedical staff, which, the team pointed out, were not properly labelled.

Other observations included lack of teaching aids in demonstration rooms, no drainage and running water facility in the post0mortem room, improper qualification of persons handling computer system, unavailability of paramedical staff to handle sophisticated equipment and also no entry of the equipment in stock registers.

Most of the rooms in the basement have high thresholds to prevent rainwater from entering. The team objected saying how could stretchers bring in patients and how could disabled persons cross that?

Overall, the team, which had an eye for detail, was keen on seeing logbooks, registers and availability of actual staff during 24 hours duty schedule. Most of the departments failed to produce properly maintained records and sometimes also fumbled while answering queries about staff or equipment.

The team visited all departments of the hospital including the OPD, post-mortem room, casualty department, emergency ward, central laboratory, ortho department, psychiatry department, OT, sterilisation unit, ICU, all wards, laundry room, hospital kitchen and also the incinerator.

The MY premises wore a haggard look with large numbers of attendants of patients asked to sit outside during the entire inspection tour of the MCI team.

The MCI team also visited the Chacha Nehru Children’s Hospital and the Cancer Hospital on MY premises. The visit after lunch hour was similar in nature to the MY tour, wherein the team members inquired about staff, equipment and various facilities.

Meanwhile, Dr Agrawal was busy pulling the plugs at the MGM College. All the teaching and non-teaching staff was asked to submit declaration forms about experience and qualification etc. An actual head count, too, was undertaken for assessing the exact staff numbers. Head count was also done for junior doctors for the first time.

The team also visited various departments to take stock of the equipment and teaching facilities and pointed out certain lacunae about infrastructure also.

Much is at stake for the College and the Hospital, the biggest government facility in the State, as an adverse report by the team may lead to curtailment of medical seats, if not cancellation of the college’s recognition.

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