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Meaningless exercise

Apropos of your editorial Less than we survey (February 29), the annual exercise of presenting the economic Survey predicting GDP growth of 8, 9 or 10 per cent has no meaning.

india Updated: Mar 02, 2008 22:18 IST

Apropos of your editorial Less than we survey (February 29), the annual exercise of presenting the economic Survey predicting GDP growth of 8, 9 or 10 per cent has no meaning. Like Cuba, we need to educate every 20 children with one teacher, eradicate malnutrition, and provide basic health facilities. Irrespective of our economic growth, the situation remains pathetic and growth remains one-sided.

N Nagarajan, Secunderabad

A white elephant

With reference to the editorial Battleship Bottomkin (February 29), India has not dealt the Gorshkov deal in a professional manner. Russia should have felt obliged that India is purchasing their obsolete junk. India is purchasing a white elephant that will not help the country have a blue water navy.

Ujjal Dutta, Delhi

Poor out of the loop

With reference to Pulin B Nayak’s article Healthy, wealthy and wise (February 28), 77 per cent of the population is on the margins of subsistence. This should be a cause for concern to those presenting the budget. This major section of the population consisting mainly of SCs and STs, the minorities and the OBCs should not be ignored while carrying out any budgetary exercise. While the economy has been growing at a fast pace, there is need to pump more resources into the agriculture sector which is the mainstay of the bulk of Indian population. Health, education and other social sectors should also get their rightful due.

K Venkataraman, Delhi

Falls of academe

The attack on the History department of Delhi University by ABVP activists must be condemned. While grievances about course content are acceptable, mechanisms exist to redress them through discussion. The political parties must restrain their outfits from such attacks on academic freedom, and the teaching fraternity needs to be sensitive to public sentiments.

JM Manchanda, via e-mail