Media must stop printing and airing unsubstantiated stories | india | Hindustan Times
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Media must stop printing and airing unsubstantiated stories

It is truly unfortunate that all Indian media houses have gone out of their way to support Bollywood actor Emraan Hashmi after he was denied a chance to buy a flat in an upmarket Mumbai locality by the residents’ association.

india Updated: Aug 02, 2009 21:42 IST

It is truly unfortunate that all Indian media houses have gone out of their way to support Bollywood actor Emraan Hashmi after he was denied a chance to buy a flat in an upmarket Mumbai locality by the residents’ association. Since there’s no proof that his offer was turned down because he’s a Muslim, media houses must desist from airing and printing Hashmi’s concocted story every other day. Such stories will have a negative impact on our society and affect communal harmony.

SK Malhotra, Delhi

A complete turnaround

The report India fights itself over Balochistan (July 31) proves that Prime Minister Manmohan Singh lacks political acumen and does not have a good grasp over foreign policy. It is difficult to digest the fact that while in May he chided Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari for his country’s involvement in the Mumbai blasts, two months down the line the same Prime Minister tried to appease his Pakistani counterpart, Yousaf Raza Gilani. The PM and his policy advisors must be more careful in future while dealing with Pakistan.

R.N. Kohli, Delhi

II

The mere mention of Balochistan in the Indo-Pak joint statement that was issued in Egypt has changed the way the world sees the two countries. Since the conclusion of the Egypt summit, Pakistan has managed to project itself as a victim of India-sponsored terrorism. As if that wasn’t enough, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, instead of apologising for his mistake, is trying to justify his error. This is completely unacceptable.

V.S. Chakravarthi, via email

III

The issue of terrorism has always been the focus of discussions between India and Pakistan. After Pakistan’s President Asif Zardari confessed to his government’s involvement in terror attacks in India, New Delhi could have built up a strong case against its neighbour on the world platform. Instead, India has opted for another round of dialogue with Pakistan in which not terrorism, but Kashmir, will be the central point. If China tomorrow wants Arunachal Pradesh as the central point in future discussion, will New Delhi concede to that as well?

K.K. Mohanty, via email

Worship in private

The Supreme Court’s decision that no place of worship would be allowed to come up on public land (No religious building on public space, August 1) is a welcome step, albeit late. In fact, one must appreciate the Gujarat Chief Minister Narendra Modi’s bold decision to demolish places of worship that were stalling road-widening projects.

R.K. Kutty, Bhopal

Learn from Kenya, South Africa

The report Tigers may vanish from 7 more parks (July 30) proves that unbridled urbanisation and ever-increasing population are putting pressure on our reserve forests and national parks. Wildlife management in India must learn from Kenya and South Africa. The governments and wildlife managers of the two countries have brought all stakeholders on the same platform and given them a chance to be a part of their conservation movements.

Tripti Srivastava, via email

Don’t blame the Metro man

In his article Still on the rails (July 30), Yashwant Raj has wrongly questioned the Delhi Metro Rail chief E. Sreedharan’s continutaion as the head of the organisation. Raj should have known that the Delhi government had insisted that he continues as the head even though he resigned after the Zamrudpur mishap.

Sreeram N, Noida