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Medical college campus casualty: 380 trees

In all, 380 trees will be cut to make space for the forthcoming campus of the Kalpana Chawla Government Medical College and Hospital (KCGMCH) here.

india Updated: Sep 09, 2013 10:10 IST
Vishal Joshi

In all, 380 trees will be cut to make space for the forthcoming campus of the Kalpana Chawla Government Medical College and Hospital (KCGMCH) here.


Besides trees, wildlife will be the causality. The campus has several banyan and peepal trees that are home to wildlife, including bats, birds and bees. According to an official report of the KCGMCH, there are nearly 1,200 trees and shrubs on the campus. All but 380 will not be cut.

According to Dr Chander Shekhar, head of zoology department, Dyal Singh College here, there are more than 15 species of birds, including myna, parakeet, pigeon and owl, having nests on trees. "Rapid urbanisation in the city in the past 20 years has affected wildlife severely. Various species, including bats, have been uprooted at least thrice. The KCGMCH authorities should spare the trees to protect the colonies of birds and mammals. The trees are beneficial for visitors as they provide shade to them," he said.

Shekhar said bats found on the medical college campus were Pteropus giganteus (fruit bats) which were mistaken to be scavenging mammals. "In the absence of high-rise and shade trees in the vicinity of the college campus, the fruit bats and other wildlife will face a challenge for survival. Urbanisation has decreased the presence of commonly seen birds in the city. Chopping of old trees will put wildlife on the verge of extinction," Shekhar said.

Dr S Kashyap, KCGMCH director, said the college administration was sensitive towards the issue and efforts would be made to minimise the threat to green cover. "For every single tree that fells on campus, we will grow 10 trees. We hope that the wildlife will search for new colonies," he added.