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Medical council polls: Doctors to move court over malpractice

Controversy is dogging the Maharashtra Medical Council again. The body, which addresses medical negligence complaints was to be formed after a 10-year gap. Elections to the council were held on April 26. Neha Bhayana reports.

india Updated: Jun 12, 2009 03:08 IST
Neha Bhayana

Controversy is dogging the Maharashtra Medical Council again. The body, which addresses medical negligence complaints was to be formed after a 10-year gap. Elections to the council were held on April 26.

Alleging irregularities and malpractice in the election, two groups of doctors plan to move court to demand a stay on the council’s formation.

In 1999, the high court had dismissed the council over similar allegations. Thereafter, an administrator was managing the body.

Currently, the council has of over 300 patients’ complaints piled up.

Doctors from the Maharashtra Reformists’ Panel and the Dr Ambedkar Medicos’ Union who had also contested the election have alleged there were many ballot papers without the polling officer’s signature.

Besides, polling stations did not display list of all candidates, as required by rules.

“We will ask for a re-count of the votes,” said Dr Jackie Lalmalani of the Maharashtra Reformists’ Panel. “If irregularities are found, we want a reelection.”

The doctors have alleged that the Indian Medical Association’s doctors who have been elected had taken voters for lectures and lunch organised by pharmaceutical companies before ferrying them to polling stations by private buses.

Dr Ambedkar Medicos’ Union has also demanded reservation for backward classes and women in the Council.

“The state government should provide reservation for the protection of backward classes,” said Dr Tushar Jagtap.

The doctors’ bodies have already submitted complaints to the chief minister’s office and the state Medical Education Department.

Medical Education Secretary Bhushan Gagrani said the government could not take any action until they had an order from the high court.

“The government can’t interfere in the electoral process,” said Gagrani.

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