Megha, farmer Gajendra's daughter, wants to live his dream | india | Hindustan Times
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Megha, farmer Gajendra's daughter, wants to live his dream

“My father always used to say, ‘IAS-RAS ban ja’ (become an IAS or Rajasthan administrative service officer)…he was very keen that I study and become independent,” said Megha, the oldest of Gajendra's daughter.

india Updated: Apr 23, 2015 19:34 IST
Rakesh Goswami
Being-the-eldest-of-Singh-s-three-children-Megha-s-playing-the-guardian-to-her-siblings-and--her-mother
Being-the-eldest-of-Singh-s-three-children-Megha-s-playing-the-guardian-to-her-siblings-and--her-mother

The tears have not stopped flowing but they cannot douse the fire of determination now blazing in Megha’s heart.

“I know he will not come back but I have to fulfill his dream now. He wanted me to be an administrative officer which I will be one day,” said the daughter of Gajendra Singh Kalyanwat, the farmer from this village in Rajasthan who allegedly committed suicide in Delhi on Wednesday.

Singh, 43, hanged himself from a tree in full public view at an Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) rally at the Jantar Mantar.

Megha, 17, is the eldest of Singh’s three children – the other two are Dhirendra,11, and Raghvendra, 7. All of them are students at a private school in Biwai, the nearest town.

“My father always used to say, ‘IAS-RAS ban ja’ (become an IAS or Rajasthan administrative service officer)…he was very keen that I study and become independent,” said Megha, an Arts student.

Still trying to come to terms with the tragedy, Megha was also playing the guardian to her younger siblings as their mother, Hema, was too numb with shock and pain and has not set foot outside her room ever last night.

Throughout the day, people trooped in and out of their single story, pucca house, politicians dropped by to offer their condolences and TV crews jostled for sound bites from family-members about the incident.

For the younger children of Singh – used to a slow-paced life away from the humdrum of urbanity – the sudden intrusion into their privacy pushed into corners of rooms or behind adult family-members.

The body of Singh reached the house, situated close to the family’s gooseberry orchard, early in the morning on Thursday. He was cremated later in the day at a hillock near the village.

“We are so shocked and depressed that many of us did not even cook food after we heard of his suicide,” said a villager.

Inderjit Singh, a doctor at the nearest primary health centre, said Singh’s father and younger brother had to be treated several times since last night for hypertension.

Gopal Singh, the farmer’s uncle, said, “His father Bane Singh has been crying since he heard the news. It has become difficult for us to control him as he fainted a couple of times while crying.”

Described as a man with political ambitions and someone who always wanted to be in news, Singh had sought ticket from the Samajwadi Party twice to contest the assembly elections from Bandikui constituency.

But despite the setbacks, he left his mark around the house.

On the door of a small room near the orchard, Singh had scrawled in green paint the words, “Gunaah karne se pehle anjaam soch le” (think about the outcome before committing a crime).

On the boundary of the orchard beside the house is a printed flex poster which says, ‘hearty welcome’.

Below it is a photograph of a young Gajendra Singh and his self-styled designation ‘Pradesh sangathan mantri’. And it also has his mobile number.

On Thursday morning, the ambulance carrying the body stopped close to the welcome sign. For all those present, the irony was hard to miss.