Mind games | india | Hindustan Times
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Mind games

Flip, flop, flip. That’s James Otis. After allowing the Antiquorum Auctioneers of New York to put Gandhi memorabilia on sale recently and then staking claim on the grounds that it was being used in “all sorts of confusing, political ways”, he now says that the auction was borne out of financial consideration.

india Updated: Mar 29, 2009 21:15 IST

Flip, flop, flip. That’s James Otis. After allowing the Antiquorum Auctioneers of New York to put Gandhi memorabilia on sale recently and then staking claim on the grounds that it was being used in “all sorts of confusing, political ways”, he now says that the auction was borne out of financial consideration. At a press conference in New Delhi last week — the exact purpose of his visit is unclear — he apologised (Oh, no, not again!) for his decision to go ahead with the auction. But just as when we thought that the real reason was out (the multi-million dollar deal, of course), Mr Otis has come up with another explanation: his intention was merely to remind people about Gandhiji’s greatness. Business tycoon Vijay Mallya ultimately bought the Mahatma’s belongings for a whopping $1.8 million.

Now, this has left us thoroughly confused because we think the Mahatma didn’t need a multi-million dollar jamboree to establish his credentials across the world.

But Mr Otis is not done yet. He now says that he and Mr Mallya are coming up with a combined list of ‘peaceful’ organisations, which would be beneficiaries of the money generated in the auction. Well, that’s as of now, before Mr Otis comes up with another creative explanation to revise his plans and continues his experiments with untruths. Time to move on.