Mining survey illegal, say Reddy brothers | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
May 30, 2017-Tuesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Mining survey illegal, say Reddy brothers

The powerful Reddy brothers of Karnataka on Monday claimed the Supreme Court-appointed Central Empowered Committee’s survey in the area where their company was carrying out mining was without any judicial order.

india Updated: Jan 04, 2010 23:23 IST
HT Correspondent

The powerful Reddy brothers of Karnataka on Monday claimed the Supreme Court-appointed Central Empowered Committee’s survey in the area where their company was carrying out mining was without any judicial order.

In their response to the Andhra Pradesh government’s appeal challenging the high court order permitting their company, Obulapuram Mining Company Private Limited, to continue with mining, the brothers claimed the CEC took a suo-motu decision to prepare a report. They also said that a private litigation between two companies has taken a political colour.

Gandhi on mont blanc
Well-known pen manufacturer, Mont Blanc, on Monday told the Supreme Court that it had given a representation to the Union of India, requesting it to use Mahatma Gandhi’s pictures on its latest limited edition pen.

The company is offering the pen at a staggering price of Rs 12 lakh. It has paid Rs 70-75 lakh to the great-grandson of the Mahatma for using the brand name. The Mahatma Gandhi Foundation will further receive between $200 and $1000 for each pen sold.

After hearing the company’s submission, a bench headed by the Chief Justice of India adjourned the hearing of a public interest litigation (PIL) challenging the use of Gandhi’s pictures on the pen’s nib.

The bench declined to pass an order on the petitioner’s plea to ban the online advertisements and hoardings promoting the pen.

The PIL, filed by two Delhi based advocates, claims that the use of Mahatma's pictures and name violates many Acts including The Emblems and Names ({Prevention of Improper Use) Act, 1950.

Can’t question courts
The Right to Information Act cannot be used for questioning orders passed by courts, the Supreme Court said on Monday and expressed its displeasure that such pleas are made under the transparency law.

“There is no right to anybody to demand such information. Such pleas are perverse and not maintainable,” a Bench comprising Chief Justice K.G. Balakrishnan and Justice B.S. Chauhan said.

The orders passed by the lower courts cannot be questioned before any other forum and has to be challenged in the higher courts, the bench.