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Muslim clerics must be taught the value of education

india Updated: Jul 14, 2010 23:11 IST

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With reference to the editorial Not going by the book (Our Take, July 13), it is unfortunate that Muslim clerics are opposing the Right to Education Act by terming it as a threat to the madrasas. Lack of modern education is one of the reasons that has kept a large part of the Muslim population educationally backward. Today’s children need modern education to keep pace with the changing times. If the Muslim community fails to understand this then future generations of Muslim children will lose out on educational and employment opportunities. It is in the interest of the Muslim community that madrasas should be transformed and integrated into the mainstream educational system.

M.C. Joshi, Lucknow

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By objecting to the implementation of the Right to Education Act, Muslim clerics are only depriving young Muslims a chance to avail modern education. In these changing times, it is regressive to hold on to the primitive ways of the madrasas that discourage independent thinking. India can grow only when the Act is uniformly operational across the nation irrespective of caste, creed or religious biases.

Surendra Deo, Delhi

They must stand together

Kashmir has, once again, been thrown into turmoil following the deaths of civilians from CRPF firings (Tracking Kashmir crisis, July 13). It is unfair to attribute the present unrest in the Valley to Omar Abdullah. While there may be complaints about his conduct as the leader of the state, he is certainly not the only person responsible for restoring peace in Kashmir. The Centre also has a role to play. Instead of playing the blame game, the government and the Opposition should cooperate to bring about normalcy in the valley.

Pawan Jalali, Mohali

The duel over fuel

Sitaram Yechury in Poverty of policy (Left Hand Drive, July 13) rightly pointed out the adverse effects that deregulation of fuel prices will have on the aam aadmi. As we saw from the widespread anger during the recent Bharat bandh, it is clear that people are unable to take the burden of inflation. By deregulating fuel prices, the UPA has made it clear that it prefers the interests of corporates to that of the common man.

Nishant Kukreja, Noida

Delhi Delaying Authority

The Delhi Development Authority (DDA) rightly deserves its place at the top for delays and corruption (At DDA office, you tout it out, July 12). The facelift that is being given to the capital before the Commonwealth Games doesn’t do enough to hide the corrupt core of the authorities. It’s a well-known fact that the delays in the preparations of the Games are due to insincerity and corruption among officials.

K. Venkataraman, Delhi

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Kudos to Hindustan Times for the evidence-based report on the malfunctioning of the DDA. Vice-chairman A.K. Nigam’s claim that ‘if papers are in order, there are no delays’, is misleading. There is too much bungling in the department and one cannot get any work done unless the officials are showered with favours. My father applied for a DDA flat in 1979 and, after 30 long years, there is still no trace of our flat.

Chandra M. Gulhati, Delhi

Wait for the next buzz

The World Cup has ended and we, the lovers of the Beautiful Game, will have to wait another four long years for another extravaganza (The mourning after, July 12). However, the idea of saving our vuvuzelas and sporting spirit for the Commonwealth Games wasn’t bad considering cricket-loving Indians don’t care much about other forms of sports.

G. David Milton, via email