Naga peace convention begins with hope for a secure future | india | Hindustan Times
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Naga peace convention begins with hope for a secure future

The two-day Naga convention for re-conciliation, called for vigorously pursuing the campaign for peace in the region to achieve the goal of a secure future envisioned by pioneers of Naga political struggle

india Updated: Feb 21, 2009 23:29 IST

The two-day Naga convention for re-conciliation, which began in Kohima on Saturday evening, called for vigorously pursuing the campaign for peace in the region to achieve the goal of a secure future envisioned by pioneers of Naga political struggle.

Setting the tone of the deliberation aimed at making the ongoing re-conciliation process more inclusive, Naga churches of different denominations today expressed their solidarity to the campaign initiated by the Forum for Naga Re-conciliation, an umbrella body comprising church workers and representatives of tribal hohos (council) and civil society organisations.

Speaking on the occasion, the church leaders insisted that everyone who committed wrongs during the long-drawn Naga struggle must reconcile with the hard realities of the society today where fear, suspicion, hatred, intolerance, selfishness were ruling the roost.

The opening session prayed for those orphans and widows who became the victims of factional fighting among rival Naga underground groups to give them strength by the Almighty.

Urging the people to ponder upon as how many Nagas were killed during the past 10 years, Nagaland Baptist Church Council general secretary Zhabu Terhuja called upon the Naga (underground) leaders to clearly spell out their vision for the people and show their wisdom to bring an end to present hostilities so that the people can have a secured future.

Eastern Naga Peoples Organisation, representing six tribes of border districts of the state, also expressed its solidarity to the peace convention held at Kohima local ground, asserting that no lasting peace was possible unless there was unity and understanding among various underground factions.