Name and shame countries which support terrorism: Foreign secy | india | Hindustan Times
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Name and shame countries which support terrorism: Foreign secy

In an oblique reference to Pakistan, Jaishankar said some countries believe they can buy peace at home by supporting groups for terror outside, which he termed as “delusional.”

india Updated: Feb 04, 2016 01:25 IST
HT Correspondent
Foreign secretary S Jaishankar called for naming and shaming of nations supporting terrorism.
Foreign secretary S Jaishankar called for naming and shaming of nations supporting terrorism.(ANI File Photo)

Foreign secretary S Jaishankar on Wednesday called for naming and shaming of nations supporting terrorism, while he said India will continue to be in touch with Pakistan over the probe into last month’s deadly terror attack on Punjab’s Pathankot airbase.

In an oblique reference to Pakistan, he said some countries believe they can buy peace at home by supporting groups for terror outside, which he termed as “delusional.”

“Even as we work to advance the prospects of a CCIT (Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism), there are a number of interim steps that can be taken,” Jaishankar said while speaking at the Counter-Terrorism Conference 2016 in Jaipur.

“The most important of them is to exercise the ability to cause reputational damage. Naming and shaming must be carried out relentlessly in the case of perpetrators, supporters and connivers of terrorism.”

His remarks came days after talks between him and his Pakistani counterpart were suspended following the airbase attack.

“Since the Pathankot attack happened, we have been in touch with Pakistan,” he said. “We have been in touch at my level and the NSA level because only by remaining in touch, we can expect them to progress on the basis of information which we have provided to them.”

The foreign secretary said tolerance for double standards on terrorism must also be exposed.

“After all, this works in other areas – whether we speak of financial defaulters, nuclear proliferators, illegal traders or just regular violators of law,” he argued.

The pressure of international public sentiments can make the costs of terrorism escalate well beyond the calculations of its practitioners, Jaishankar said.

“A second and related activity is to use diplomacy to isolate those indulging in terrorism,” he added.